Why does it get hotter for weeks after the summer solstice even though the days are getting shorter?

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Dear Tom,
Why does it get hotter for weeks after the summer solstice even though the days are getting shorter?
Thanks, Steve G.

Dear Steve,

Chicago’s temperatures continue rising for about five weeks after the summer solstice because, on average, incoming heat from sunlight is still greater than heat lost into space. Incoming heat (in the Northern Hemisphere) reaches its maximum on the summer solstice, then begins decreasing, but it takes about five weeks for it to be overtaken by heat loss. The year’s highest average temperatures (85/67) occur during the July 11-24 period. The opposite occurs on the winter solstice (about Dec. 21). Incoming heat begins to increase, but heat lost into space is still greater for another month, so the average temperature bottoms out (31/18) from January 16-28.

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