NEW EVIDENCE THAT AN ASTEROID STRIKE NEAR THE YUCATAN PENINSULA 66 MILLION YEARS AGO PRODUCED A DEVASTATING COOLING OF EARTH’S CLIMATE WHICH WIPED OUT THE DINOSAURS AND NEARLY THREE-QUARTERS OF LIFE ON EARTH.

This is the stuff of science fiction movies–only it’s real. An asteroid 100 times the size of the International Space Station (ISS) smashed into our planet off the Yucatan Peninsula 66 million years ago setting off what researcher Aubrey Zerkle of Blue Marble Space Institute of Science refers to as” ….one of the highest-profile cosmic disasters in Earth history—it coincided with a planetwide extinction event that decimated nonavian dinosaurs and wiped out more than three quarters of life on Earth. The long-term biological consequences of this event are well established—the ecological reorganization that followed signified an end to the Mesozoic “Age of Reptiles” and ushered in the Cenozoic “Age of Mammals.”

The asteroid’s impact was catastrophic creating an impact structure the size of Hawaii which scientists discovered in 1991 off the coast of Mexico. Subsequent dating of melted glass in its walls confirmed a theory first proposed in 1980 to a skeptical scientific community by geologist Walter Alvarez and his Nobel Prize-winning father physicist Luis–a theory questioned for the decade until the subsea crater was discovered and data.

But as catastrophic as the asteroid impact was–creating a mammoth tsunami and vaporizing water where it lands while throwing sun blocking debris and aerosols into the atmosphere which shut down photosynthesis and blocked sunlight for years, it was the climate shift which lingered beyond the impact which produced the deadly toll. And new research outlined in this article in the American Geophysical Society journal EOS supports the impact that climate shift had in decimating such a spectacular proportion of life on Earth at the time.

It’s a fascinating read—as is Zerkle’s observation, “Asteroid impacts constitute the single greatest unavoidable threat to life on Earth—the K-Pg event was the most recent, most deadly point of comparison. As of June this year, NASA’s Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) has detected 849 near-Earth asteroids with a diameter of 1 kilometer or greater. The full list of near-Earth objects (NEOs) currently contains 13 objects with an impact probability of 1 in 10,000 or higher, the largest of which is a half kilometer in diameter, about 5% the size of the Chicxulub asteroid.”

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE