Best kids’ baseball cleats

Baseball & Softball

A pair of cleats can use different types and patterns of studs depending on which sport they’re intended for, but when it comes to kids having fun, that’s less important than fit and comfort.

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Which kids’ baseball cleats are best?

There’s nothing like a good pair of cleats to step up your child’s baseball game. The tight fit protects their feet from rolling, the studs on the outsole grip into the dirt and grass for better movement and, let’s be frank, they look pretty cool. Luckily, they are also relatively affordable, since manufacturers are aware of how quickly kids can outgrow their clothing.

The best kids’ baseball cleats are the Nike Vapor Ultrafly 3 Keystone Baseball. Their cleats are strong, the shoes are easy to tightly secure on the foot and they are unisex, which makes them easy to pass on or resell.

What to know before you buy kids’ baseball cleats

Studs

Kid’s baseball cleats can have studs made of metal, plastic or rubber, or a special type of stud known as “turf.”

  • Metal: Metal studs are more expensive and are banned by certain leagues, as they can cause more damage to other children’s feet when the cleat slides into or steps on another child’s foot. The main benefit of metal cleats is to provide extra grip on harder types of ground.
  • Plastic/rubber: The most common stud type for kids’ baseball cleats. They’re good for many types of ground and tend to be more durable than other cleats. Some baseball cleat manufacturers make the studs and the outsole the same piece of rubber/plastic, while others use screw-in studs so you can change the length as needed, depending on the field’s ground type.
  • Turf: Turf studs aren’t really studs — they’re more like little nubs on the outsole of the shoe. They work best on artificial ground or for indoor wiffleball. They are also popular choices when cleats with real studs of any kind aren’t allowed.

What to look for in quality kids’ baseball cleats

Ankle support

Kids’ baseball cleats come in three levels of ankle support.

  • Low: Low kids’ baseball cleats stop right underneath the ankle, meaning there is no ankle support at all. This style offers increased mobility, which is useful for those playing positions inside the diamond.
  • Medium: Medium kids’ baseball cleats provide some ankle support while minimizing the restrictive feeling of a high kids’ baseball cleat.
  • High: High kids’ baseball cleats aren’t manufactured very often, making them hard to find and expensive. Most children don’t like the restrictive feeling of a shoe that covers the ankle, and children rarely play at a level where ankle support is truly needed or beneficial.

How much you can expect to spend on kids’ baseball cleats

Kids’ baseball cleats can cost anywhere from $15 to $100. Baseball cleats for less than $30 aren’t meant to last and generally feature the bare minimum for quality, making them best for kids new to a sport they may not want to play for long. For their second year and up, you can safely spend between $30 and $50 for a sturdier pair. If your child is serious about performing at their best, then you can look into the top-of-the-line options that cost $50 and up.

Kids’ baseball cleats FAQ

Does a child’s position on the baseball diamond really matter when buying a pair of kid’s baseball cleats?

That depends on how serious your child is about baseball and whether they have one position they play or move around the field as needed. If they’re serious about performing at their very best, then the material of the studs of the cleat can make a noticeable difference. Otherwise, any solid kids’ baseball cleat will be more than enough. 

How do I know if my child’s cleats aren’t too tight?

Kids’ baseball cleats should be fairly stiff when you first purchase them, as it’s the stiffness of the fit which provides the support for your child’s foot. It should feel tight without restricting blood flow. The cleat will stretch into a more comfortable state after a little bit of use, with leather stretching more and synthetics stretching less, so a loose fit right after purchase means the cleat is too big.

What are the best kid’s baseball cleats to buy?

Top kid’s baseball cleats

Nike Vapor Ultrafly 3 Keystone Baseball

Nike Vapor Ultrafly 3 Keystone Baseball

What you need to know: A comfortable, stylish and unisex kids’ baseball cleat.

What you’ll love: These kids’ baseball cleats are perfect for more than just baseball, including football and soccer.

What you should consider: Children with wider bridges might feel squeezed by these kids’ baseball cleats, as they tend to run narrow.

Where to buy: Sold by Amazon

Top kid’s baseball cleats for the money

Nike Vapor Ultrafly 3 Keystone Baseball

Adidas Icon V Molded Cleat

What you need to know: A more affordable kids’ baseball cleat with all the same performance.

What you’ll love: Many reviews highlighted just how comfortable these kids’ baseball cleats were for their children.

What you should consider: If maximizing affordability is your main goal, then there are still less expensive kids’ baseball cleats, though these are some of the better-performing options for less.

Where to buy: Sold by Amazon and Dick’s Sporting Goods

Worth checking out

Nike Vapor Ultrafly 3 Keystone Baseball

Under Armour Kids’ Unisex Leadoff Low Rm Jr. Baseball Shoe

What you need to know: A lighter-weight shoe for those who need to maximize their speed.

What you’ll love: The toe area is reinforced for protection against accidental damage from teammates, errant balls, etc.

What you should consider: The included shoelaces are on the short side.

Where to buy: Sold by Amazon and Dick’s Sporting Goods

 

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Jordan Woika writes for BestReviews. BestReviews has helped millions of consumers simplify their purchasing decisions, saving them time and money.

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