CHICAGO – Since the early days of the summer, runners from the area, across the country, and around the world have begun training for the moment they hit the streets of Chicago on October 9th.

While there are a lot of things that these athletes can control about their training, there is one big thing that they cannot when it comes to the Chicago Marathon: The weather.

The temperature has a major effect on the runners, with warm or cool temperatures making a difference in times for some participants. Precipitation could also make the course a little more of a challenge for those completing the 26.2 miles on Sunday morning and afternoon.

So what does the weather look like for Sunday? Right now, rather pleasant.

Per the WGN Weather Center, the high for the day is expected to be 65 degrees for a high with a low of 49, which is seasonable for this time of year.

Leading up to the race, the Chicago Marathon’s Event Alert Status is green, with they define as ideal conditions for marathon running.

This is a difference from the 2021 race where the high was 79 degrees with a 68-degree temperature at the start of the race.

So how does this year’s weather compare to the usual temperature of the race? According to FindMyMarathon.com, it’s pretty close to average.

In the last 17 Chicago Marathons dating back to 2005, the average high temperature for the event is 67 degrees with a low of 51, with an average of 52 degrees at the start of the race.

The warmest temperatures in that span came in the 2007 race, when the start temperature was 72 degrees with a daytime high of 88 degrees. The heat was so bad the race was called off halfway through as participants were slowed by the high temperatures.

Two years later came the coolest race in the last 17 years with the temperature at the race start at 32 degrees with a high of 45 degrees in 2009.