Celebs dress in black as part of ‘MeToo’ protest at Golden Globes

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Zuri Hall arrives for the 75th Golden Globe Awards on January 7, 2018, in Beverly Hills, California. (VALERIE MACON/AFP/Getty Images)

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NEW YORK — The highly anticipated wear-black protest at the Golden Globes got off to an early start Sunday as soon as the red carpet opened, including Michelle Williams in an embellished off-the-shoulder look and “Me Too” founder Tarana Burke at her side.

The 75th Golden Globes will be the most prominent and public display yet for the “MeToo” movement that has swept through Hollywood and left a trail of disgraced men in its wake. What has long been, first and foremost, a star-studded primetime party may this Sunday take on the tenor of a protest rally.

Out of solidarity with the victims of sexual harassment and assault, many women have said they will be dressing in black for the Globes. It’s a plan that, on the red carpet and on the stage, will ensure the spotlight remains on the film industry’s endemic gender imbalances.

“That will be really powerful,” Allison Janney, a supporting actress nominee for the Tonya Harding tale “I, Tonya,” said earlier this week. “I will be in a black dress and be proud to be standing there with the other actresses.”

Turning the Globes dark on the fashion front had been anticipated for days after a call for massive reform following the downfall of movie mogul Harvey Weinstein and numerous others in Hollywood, media, fashion, tech, publishing and other industries. The new initiative Time’s Up, backed by more than 300 women in Hollywood, doled out pins intended for those who might already have locked in more colorful looks.

Allison Williams provided a pop of orange and silver on the bodice of her black column gown.

Not everybody supports the protest. Rose McGowan, who has accused Weinstein of rape, has loudly and persistently called the effort an empty gesture.

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