Tom Skilling on Climate Disruption

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Climate change deniers claim global warming stopped more than a decade ago. But WGN Chief Meteorologist Tom Skilling is here to tell us about a new study that shows NO slowdown.

The study was conducted by a team from NOAA- the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Researchers found that the rate of global warming in the past 15 years has been as fast, or faster, than any seen in the latter half of the 20th century. Argonne National Laboratory scientists are actively involved in the study of climate disruption. And more importantly, what we can do about it.

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Religious leaders, including Pope Francis, are now speaking out about the urgent need for action, saying, “Climate change threatens us all, and we have the power to do something about it.” We’ve compiled a number of links and web extras that explain what’s happening in greater detail at wgntv.com

http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2015/noaa-analysis-journal-science-no-slowdown-in-global-warming-in-recent-years.html

http://www.amazon.com/Change-Minds-About-Changing-Climate/dp/1615192239

http://www.anl.gov/

Producer Pam Grimes and Photojournalist Mike D'Angelo contributed to this report

Web Extras:

Web extra: Why the name changes? 

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From global warming, to climate change, to climate disruption. Why all the name changes?  Argonne National Laboratory climate scientist and author Doug Sisterson explains.

Web exgra: Fossil Fuels

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Nanoscientist and author Seth Darling from Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont explains why fossil fuels are so harmful to the environment.

Web extra: Who are the deniers? 

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Ninety-seven percent of the world's scientists now agree that climate disruption is real, and humans are causing it. So who are those other 3 percent?

Web extra: Climate history

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Argonne National Laboratory climate scientist Seth Darling explains why the planet began warming in the 1970s.

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