CHICAGO – Friends and family of the three men killed in a South Shore hit-and-run came together Sunday to grieve and offer support.

It’s been one week since the deaths of Devonta Vivetter, Donald Huey and Jaylen Ausley in what police said was an intentional hit-and-run.

As loved ones processed their pain, a healing vigil was held along the lake where mourners placed memorials for each victim. Ausley’s family spoke about the late 23-year-old, who worked with and motivated young people at the Gary Comer Youth Center on the South Side.

“You ask anyone that came across him, they talk about his loving spirit and his ability to put others first,” said Curtis Henderson, Ausley’s cousin.

Police said the crash happened around 5 a.m. Sunday in the 7000 block of S. Jeffery, when a silver sedan traveling southbound struck four men.

Surveillance video captured the incident.

“I want justice for my son Donald and the other families,” said Charlitha Riley, mother of Donald Huey.

Among friends and family were LGBTQ activists and allies to help one another heal amid calls for justice.

“I know what you know. I saw what you saw. It affected our whole city and it affected the Pride community and the Rainbow community,” said LGBTQ advocate Dawn Valenti.

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While the verdict is still out on what exactly led to last Sunday’s tragedy, Jae Rice with Brave Space Alliance says Donald, Devonta and Jaylen were fighting injustice, along with a lack of love and community.

“Which is what the South Side Black Queer community is lacking,” Rice said. “We don’t have a lot of safe spaces. We don’t have intentional support. We don’t have intergenerational connections.”

It’s why organizers and attendees at Sunday’s vigil emphasized the importance of spreading love.

“The next generation, please love each other,” Valenti said. “We got enough hate from the outside world still continuing to happen today.”