Virtual town halls shift focus to impact of coronavirus on city’s African American community

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Saturday’s virtual town hall gave a chance for residents to ask questions about the newly deployed Racial Equity Rapid Response team for the coronavirus.

The forum, held online, featured discussions on how the virus is impacting Chicago’s African American community and also gave a chance for officials to debunk rumors.

Saturday’s virtual town hall forum gave a chance for residents to ask questions about the newly deployed Racial Equity Rapid Response team for the coronavirus.

“Overall 60% of our deaths remain in the African American community in Chicago,” Dr. Arwady said.

Mayor Lightfoot has deployed a Racial Equity Rapid Response team to help slow the spread in certain communties that have been hit hard.

46% of coronavirus cases in Chicago are among African Americans.

“The idea is to arm communities like Auburn Gresham with tools,” Mayor Lightfoot said. “Communities chosen because they’re experiencing the worst impacts of this crisis.”

The town halls have been held for South Shore, Austin and Auburn Gresham residents so far.

Saturday, neighbors were encouraged to stay home, wear masks in public and seek help if feeling depressed.

“Shelter in place doesn’t mean to isolate yourself. There are ways to communicate with those who are living outside your home,” said Dr. Jasmine.

Many residents in those neighborhoods have underlying conditions like ashmtha, diabetes and hypertension.

In Austin, 82 people have died from coronavirus. In Auburn Gresham, the virus has killed 70.

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