Defense rests in Smollett trial

Chicago News

Live updates:

12:30 p.m. — Smollett defense rests

Jussie Smollett’s attorneys rested their case around 12:30 p.m. Tuesday. Linn told jurors that they will be dismissed for the day.

Closing arguments and jury deliberations are set for Wednesday morning.

12:05 p.m. — Judge chides Smollett over responses to questions; Actor finishes testifying

Judge James Linn scolded Smollett as he continued his testimony late Tuesday morning.

Throughout his time on the witness stand, Smollett expressed frustration at the wording of questions from Dan Webb. Smollett said it was difficult for him to answer “yes or no” because, he said, some details in Webb’s questions were inaccurate.

During re-direct with his attorney Nenye Uche, Smollett drew criticism from Linn, with the judge telling Smollett: “You can only answer questions that are asked. You can’t volunteer information.

Smollett finished testifying shortly after noon.

11:15 a.m. — Cross-examination concludes

Webb covered much ground during his initial questioning of Smollett: his communications with Abimbola Osundairo, his February 2019 interview on “Good Morning America,” as well as his interviews with detectives who initially investigated the case.

Throughout his testimony, Smollett’s position has remained the same: he steadfastly denies any involvement in any sort of hoax.

10:30 a.m. — Smollett testimony resumes

Jussie Smollett resumed his testimony around 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, facing cross-examination from Dan Webb of the special prosecutor’s office.

As he did Monday, Smollett flatly denied any involvement in a hoax, let alone a phony hate crime.

“I never said anything about wanting an attack to take place,” Smollett said Tuesday.

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CHICAGO (AP) — Jussie Smollett will return to the witness stand Tuesday at his trial in Chicago, where the former “Empire” actor called claims that he staged an anti-gay, racist attack on himself “100% false.”

Prosecutors will continue cross-examining the 39-year-old, who appeared calm through several hours of testimony Monday. He told jurors “there was no hoax” and that he was the victim of a hate crime in his downtown Chicago neighborhood.

Smollett, who faces charges that he lied to Chicago police about the January 2019 attack, sought to refute damaging testimony from two brothers last week. They said Smollett, who is gay and Black, orchestrated the hoax to get publicity, giving them $100 for supplies and instructing them to place a noose around his neck and yell homophobic slurs. They also said Smollett gave them a $3,500 check to carry it out.

Smollett said he wrote the $3,500 check to Abimbola Osundairo for nutrition and training advice. Asked by his defense attorney if he gave Osundairo payment for some kind of hoax, Smollett replied: “Never.”

Attorney Nenye Uche asked again if he planned a hoax.

“No,” Smollett said, “there was no hoax.”

Smollett told jurors he had just returned from a trip and was walking home after buying a sandwich around 2 a.m. on Jan. 29, 2019, when someone yelled a racist, homophobic remark. Smollett said he turned around to confront the person, who he said towered over him.

Standing up in the Chicago courtroom, Smollett demonstrated how he said the man walked quickly toward him, then pointed to his left temple to show where the man hit him.

“I would like to think I landed a punch. But I don’t know if it landed,” Smollett said. He said they tussled on the ground for up to 30 seconds and he saw a second attacker as that person ran away.

Smollett said he assumed the person who attacked him was white because he used a racial slur and shouted “MAGA country,” an apparent reference to then-President Donald Trump’s campaign slogan, “Make America Great Again.” The brothers, Abimbola and Olabingo Osundairo, who are Black, testified last week that Smollett instructed them to yell “this is MAGA country” during the fake assault.

Smollett said he picked up his phone and told the person he had been talking to that he “got jumped.” He testified that he noticed he had a noose around his neck as he returned to his apartment. Smollett said he removed the noose but a friend who was at his apartment called police and told him to put the noose back on so officers could see it. Smollett said he was upset police had been called because he would never have done so.

“I am a Black man in America. I do not trust the police,” Smollett said. “I am also a well known figure at that time and I am an openly gay man.”

Under cross-examination, Smollett said he refused to give Chicago police his cellphone for their investigation because he wanted his privacy. Asked by special prosecutor Dan Webb if he was concerned the phone would show several calls to Abimbola Osundairo, Smollett said no.

Smollett also testified that Osundairo told him he could get an herbal steroid that encourages weight loss but is illegal in the U.S. “on the low” — or secretly — while he was on an upcoming trip to Nigeria.

Osundairo testified that Smollett sent him a text message about talking “on the low,” and that during the conversation Smollett asked him about helping to stage the attack. Smollett said Monday that message was in reference to the illegal steroid.

When Webb asked about Osundairo’s testimony that Smollett recruited him for a hoax, Smollett replied: “Fully false, 100% false.”

Defense attorneys have suggested that the Osundairo brothers accused Smollett of staging the hoax because they disliked him and then saw an opportunity to make money. They suggested that after the brothers were questioned by police about the alleged attack, they asked Smollett for $1 million each to not testify against him.

Smollett said he met Abimbola Osundairo in 2017 at a club, where he learned Osundairo also worked on the “Empire” set. He said the two men did drugs together and went to a bathhouse, where Smollett said they “made out.” He said the two men later did more drugs and participated in sex acts together. Osundairo testified last week that he and Smollett did not have a sexual relationship.

Smollett testified that he met Abimbola’s brother, Olabingo, but that they didn’t speak. He said Abimbola Osundairo made it seem like they needed to “sneak off” when they were together around his brother. Smollett said he never trusted Olabingo Osundairo.

Prosecutors say Smollett staged the attack because he was unhappy with the “Empire” studio’s response to hate mail he received. The letter included a drawing of a stick figure hanging by a noose, with a gun pointed at it, and the word “MAGA.”

Smollett, 39, is charged with six counts of felony disorderly conduct for making what prosecutors say was a false police report about the alleged attack — one count for each time he gave a report — to three different officers. The class 4 felony carries a prison sentence of up to three years, but experts have said if Smollett is convicted he likely would be placed on probation and ordered to perform community service.

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