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CHICAGO — Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx announced Tuesday there would be no charges in two deadly police-involved shootings that occurred last year.

Adam Toledo,13, was shot and killed by Chicago police officer Eric Stillman in March 2021 during a foot chase in Little Village. Video footage of the shooting showed Stillman shooting Toledo once in the chest around 2:30 a.m. on March 29 in the alley of the 2300 block of South Spaulding.

Adam Toledo

Toledo was shot after the 13-year-old and another man, 21-year-old Ruben Roman, ran away from police. Officers were responding to the area for a report of gunfire.

In the video, Toledo had his hands up after ditching a gun less than a second before Stillman opened fire.

“Adam Toledo was turning his body towards officer Stillman with his left hand raised while also discarding the firearm that he held in his right hand,” Kim Foxx said in a Tuesday press conference.

Several protests were held in the wake of Toledo’s shooting.

Anthony Alvarez

Two days later, 22-year-old Anthony Alvarez was shot during a foot chase in Portage Park by CPD officer Evan Solano. Body camera footage shows Alvarez was walking near a gas station and carrying a gun. He was shot in his back and left knee.

On bodycam footage, Alvarez crumples to the ground and asks the officer: “Why’d you shoot me?”

Solano replied: “You had a gun.”

Alvarez later died at a hospital.

On Tuesday, Foxx said no charges would be filed in either case. Prosecutors said they could not meet the necessary burden of proof to bring charges, according to Foxx.

In the Alvarez shooting, Foxx said Solano did violate police foot pursuit policies.

“These policy violations may have further exacerbated conditions that led to this deadly encounter,” Foxx said.

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Following the two shootings, Lightfoot called for a review of the CPD’s foot pursuit policy.

On Tuesday afternoon, the attorneys who represent the Toledo family released the following statement saying the Toledo family is “profoundly disappointed.” They said a civil complaint has been filed seeking monetary damages against Officer Stillman and the City of Chicago.

“We are profoundly disappointed, as is the Toledo family, to learn that the Cook County State’s Attorney has declined to prosecute Officer Eric Stillman. Despite that decision, we will continue fighting for Adam and have filed our civil complaint seeking monetary damages against Officer Stillman and the City of Chicago in our effort to get justice for Adam and the Toledo family. Officer Stillman’s use of deadly force was excessive and posed a threat to the safety of Adam and others. We will be contacting the Department of Justice Civil Rights Division to address this horrific travesty.

“Adam obeyed the police officer’s commands, stopped running, had his hands up in the surrender position, and was nevertheless shot and killed by Officer Stillman. Despite the painful loss of Adam, the Toledo family continues to call for peace on the streets of Chicago as they pursue justice through the court system.”

Mayor Lightfoot released the following statement.

“Every shooting death in our city–every loss of life–is a tragedy. The loss of Adam Toledo and Anthony Alvarez remains tragic and painful for their families, loved ones, and friends. We must continue to support the families of Adam Toledo, Anthony Alvarez, and their respective communities as they continue to grieve. Keeping their communities, as well as the rest of Chicago safe, remains the top priority for me and my administration. However, in order to accomplish this, trust must be a two-way street between our residents and our officers. This trust is vital to their safety and the safety of entire communities. Following today’s announcement by the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office regarding their Office’s evaluation of criminal charges related to the shooting deaths of Adam Toledo and Anthony Alvarez, that work to build that trust continues, in partnership with the Chicago Office for Police Accountability and our Chicago Police Department. As part of our commitment to reform, over the past year, we have implemented a new foot pursuit policy and have begun working alongside community partners and the City Council to create the new civilian police oversight body. But there remains much more to do.”