Chicago History Museum reopens, free admission through July

Chicago News

CHICAGO – The Chicago History Museum recently reopened to the public with free admission through July.

The museum opened on July 10 and admission is free for all guest through July 31.

The museum will have the following safety protocols.

  • Face coverings will be required inside the Museum for all staff and visitors over the age of two.
  • Advance ticket purchasing. Guests should reserve their tickets online in advance for digital scanning upon arrival to reduce in-person contact. Reserve your ticket here.
  • Capacity will be limited to 275 people. Tickets will be timed, and guests should plan their visit within the window of time which they reserve their ticket.
    • Monday – Saturday: 9:30-12:30 and 12:30-3:30 pm
    • Sunday: 12:00 – 2:30 pm and 2:30-4:00 pm
  • Research Center capacity will be limited to 8 researchers per day, appointments will be required. The Research Center will open July 14 with hours of Tuesday – Friday, 12-3:30.
  • Groups will be limited to a maximum of 10 people.
  • Guests will be asked to maintain a 6-foot distance from other.
  • We ask anyone with a fever, cough, shortness of breath or who has been exposed to someone with these symptoms reschedule their visit  at info@chicagohistory.org or 312.642.4600.

The museum will be open Monday–Saturday, 9:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m., Sunday, 12–5 p.m.

“We at the Chicago History Museum are thrilled to reopen our doors to visitors as we continue sharing Chicago stories and connecting with our communities,” said Gary T. Johnson, president of the Chicago History Museum. “After months of being home, we know Chicagoans are eager to reconnect with all that our city has to offer. We are grateful to our supporters for their continued commitment to our mission, and we are honored to welcome them back to the Museum to share in experiences that shape our city’s history.”

The museum’s newest exhibition, “Millions of Moments: The Chicago Sun-Times Photo Collection,” will also be open to the public. “Millions of Moments” documents monumental events and everyday occurrences of life in Chicago, many of which were never published.

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