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Former White Sox broadcaster Hawk Harrelson wins the 2020 Ford C. Frick Award

CHICAGO - SEPTEMBER 23: Chicago White Sox broadcaster Ken "Hawk" Harrelson acknowledges the Chicago White Sox players and staff on the field as he wrapped up his final game as the television play-by-play voice of the White Sox on September 23, 2018 at Guaranteed Rate Field in Chicago, Illinois. Harrelson began his career with the White Sox in 1982. (Photo by Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images)

COOPERSTOWN, NY – When it comes to honors in the broadcasting of baseball, it doesn’t get much bigger than the Ford C. Frick Award from the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Now Ken “Hawk” Harrelson gets to add this honor to his career in the game.

On Wednesday, the Hall of Fame named the former White Sox play-by-play broadcaster the winner of the Frick Award for 2020. The honor is given annually to a longtime announcer for excellence in the profession.

Harrelson, who retired following the 2018 season, spent 43 years as a broadcaster in the MLB. The majority of those came with the White Sox, as his enthusiastic calls and raw emotion became signatures of his 34 years with the franchise.

“Ken Harrelson created a bond between the White Sox and their fans with his unabashed love of South Side Chicago baseball,” said President of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum Tim Mead in a news release. “Each time he stepped into the booth, ‘Hawk’ called the game with the passion of a fan and the knowledge of an MLB All-Star. As the narrator for some of the greatest moments in White Sox history, including the franchise’s 2005 World Series championship, Ken’s voice will echo for all time throughout the Windy City.”

Harrelson wil receive the award on Saturday, July 25th in Cooperstown during the Baseball Hall of Fame Induction Weekend.

A nine-year MLB veteran, Harrelson also broadcast games for the Red Sox and Yankees in his career. He took a break from broadcasting to take the White Sox general manager job in 1986.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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