CPS cancels classes Monday as teachers’ strike, contract talks continue

WATCH ABOVE: Representatives of the Chicago Teachers’ Union speak after contract negotiations Sunday night. Viewers be advised: This video contains some profanity from a bystander.

CHICAGO — As negotiations continue between Chicago Public Schools and the Chicago Teachers Union Sunday, classes are officially canceled Monday for more than 300,000 CPS students, the district announced on social media.

“CTU and SEIU are currently on strike, which means classes and after school activities are canceled tomorrow,” the district said on Twitter. “School buildings will be open for students who need a safe place to stay during the day.”

No school means, of course, no extracurricular activities or sporting events. CPS Student athletes whose season and possible scholarships hang in the balance say they’re anxious for a deal.

Sources say the union and CPS have come to a tentative agreement on eight issues, with substantial movement across most of the board. Negotiators continue to meet at Malcolm X College Sunday.

Movement reported Saturday includes progress on two key issues that CPS refused to discuss in over 10 months of bargaining: class size and staffing needs.

Parents 4 Teachers, a city-wide parent advocacy group closely aligned with the Chicago Teachers Union, held a rally in Welles Park Sunday.

Classes were canceled Thursday and Friday, as 25,000 Chicago Public School teachers and staff walked off the job for the strike. Chicago is the nation’s third largest school district.

In addition to asking for more pay, smaller class sizes and more staffing, teachers also want more done in affordable housing. The CTU wants access to low income housing for new teachers and an estimated 16,450 homeless students.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot said previously that CPS is not planning to make up days lost by the strike by extending the school year.

This is the first time CPS teachers have gone on strike since 2012. That strike lasted seven days.

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