South Side memorial will commemorate those killed by gun violence

CHICAGO — A South Side memorial will soon commemorate those who lost their lives to gun violence.

Delphine Cherry’s 16-year-old daughter, Tyesa Abney, was shot and killed outside a movie theater on Jan. 17, 1992. She was the unintended target shot dead after there was a fight involving strangers a short distance away.

Cherry created a memorial in remembrance of her daughter as part of the Gun Violence Memorial Project. It will soon become part of an art exhibit to be on display at the Chicago Cultural Center from September to January. In time, it will travel to the nation’s capital.

This past weekend, six people were shot and killed in Chicago, and 24 others were wounded.

The memorial seeks to go beyond the statistics.

Pam Bosley is a driving force behind the Purpose Over Pain organization in Chicago. Her son, Terrell Bosley, was an aspiring musician who was shot dead in 2006 as waited outside church for a concert he was about to participate in to start.

“To show that these aren’t just numbers, these are children,” Bosley said. “Terrell player drums, so I’m going to put drums in his box. They were human beings. They will never be forgotten.”

Each donation and artistic creation will go to the never-ending effort to stop the killings.

Cherry is part of the national effort through the Brady Organization.

Her loss has doubled over the years. Cherry also lost her son, Tyler Randolph, Dec. 22, 2012. He was more than likely robbed in front of his home soon after he got off of work. He was found dead with the car running. She made an artifact for him as well, and he will join the one for his sister.

Each artifact will be placed inside a glass brick, which will go toward building a glass house. In total, there will be 700 bricks used, which represents the average number of people killed by gun violence per week in the United States.

For more information on the memorial, or information on how to contribute, visit massdesigngroup.org.

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