Willson Contreras heads to the IL and will have MRI on injured hamstring

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS - JULY 13: Willson Contreras #40 of the Chicago Cubs drops his bat after hitting a three run home run in the first inning against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Wrigley Field on July 13, 2019 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Quinn Harris/Getty Images)

CHICAGO – In what has been a positive series for the Cubs, it was quite a bad sight for the team on Saturday.

After all, this has happened before to Willson Contreras, and it knocked him out of the lineup for a bit. Now the fear is that could be the case again.

In the seventh inning of Saturday’s game with the Brewers at Wrigley Field, the catcher strained his right hamstring running down the line after hitting the ball to left field.

An emotional Contreras was upset the minute it happened and remained upset as he went into the dugout. Contreras has a similar injury occur in August of 2017 as he was going through a season in which he was an outside candidate to win the MVP award. He would end up missing just under a month that season, but the prognosis for the 2019 hamstring injury is still unknown.

For now, Contreras is on the 10-day IL, with Taylor Davis coming up to the Cubs to take his place. An MRI is scheduled for Monday that will give the Cubs a better idea of how long he might be out.

Should it be a long-term absence, it would be a major obstacle to overcome for the Cubs as they remain in a tight race for the National League Central division crown. Contreras is the clear No. 1 catcher for the team and has been enjoying an All-Star 2019 season, posting a slash line of .275/.365/.525 with 19 homers and 57 RBI.

Victor Caratini takes over the main catching duties with Davis sliding into the backup role. The Cubs would have had Martin Maldonado to do so, but with Contreras healthy, he was traded to the Astros on Wednesday for Tony Kemp.

Unable to make a trade for a catcher in August like years past, the Cubs would have to look to the waiver wire for a replacement outside the organization. So the hope for the Cubs, just as it was two years ago, is that the injury isn’t as serious as it might have appeared on Saturday afternoon.

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