R. Kelly left jail, went to same McDonald’s where he picked up 16-year-old in 1998: journalist

CHICAGO — Musician R. Kelly was a free man Monday after spending three nights in the Cook County Jail and posting a $100,000 bail bond.

Kelly, 52, walked out of the jail around 5:25 p.m. Monday, just hours after his attorney entered a not guilty plea on his behalf of allegations he sexually abused a woman and three girls over the course of 12 years.

Kelly walked out to a large media gathering outside the jail. The singer said nothing as he got into a black truck that was waiting for him. The truck then drove off.

His lawyer had said he did not have the $100,000 to pay for bail. However, a Romeoville woman, who identified herself as friend on the bond slip, came through and paid it for him.

Journalist Jim DeRogatis has been covering Kelly for decades and chronicles that in an upcoming book, "Soulless: The Case Against R. Kelly."

"I think the state's indictment is far too little too late and doesn't nearly come close to covering the enormity of Kelly's crimes," DeRogatis said on WGN Morning News. "I have much more confidence in the FBI and IRS investigation... Homeland Security is now the agency in charge of sex trafficking investigations and I think that's the charge that should be leveled against Kelly.

"The courts failed 48 young women whose names I know, from 28 years. Victim No. 1 was from 1991. Kelly picked her up at her high school choir class at Kentwood Academy," said DeRogatis.

Kelly spent his first moments of freedom making stops at McDonald's and a cigar shop. DeRogatis said there's a story to that.

"In the Rock N' Roll McDonald's, in 1998, he picked up a 16-year-old Chicago high school girl, according to her publicly filed lawsuit. She was in her prom dress. She and her cousin had just come from the prom. Their dates stayed in the limo, while they went inside to get snacks. Kelly picked her up. She began a sexual relationship with him, at 16, he impregnated her and forced her to have an abortion."

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