Mystery surrounds pilot in California plane crash who claimed Chicago ties

YORBA LINDA, Calif. — The mystery deepens into the pilot of a small plane who crashed in California  killing four people on the ground.

The Cessna 4-14 likely broke apart mid-air - raining debris down on a dozen homes in Yorba Linda, California Sunday.

At the controls was a man authorities identified as 75-year-old Anthony Pastini of Nevada. A decade ago, a local newspaper quoted Pastini as saying he had been a Chicago police officer for 21 years. And the restaurant he owned outside of Reno had become a cop hangout.

Pastini was carrying what appeared to be a Chicago police star but officials in Chicago said he was never a CPD and the badge itself was fake.
The badge number was reported missing in 1978.

The LA Times reports Pastini wasn’t even his original name. He was born Jordan Isaacson and changed it in the mid 1970s.

The National Transportation Safety Board is only in the early stages of investigating the cause of the crash that killed four members of the same family.  Roy Lee Anderson, 85, and Dahlia Marlies Leber Anderson, 68, both of Yorba Linda; Stacie Norene Leber, 48, of Corona; and Donald Paul Elliott, 58, of Norco, were all killed in the crash, the Orange County Sheriff's Department Coroner Division said Wednesday.

The family of the victims said in a statement on Wednesday they were "devastated by the loss" and called the Southern California home a "beacon for so many family and friends where many celebrations were held."

The crash happened as they gathered for a Super Bowl party.

Three days before the crash, Pastini posted a cryptic statement on Facebook and wrote:

No need for any response. FB takes your time away. Posts and comments are usually BS! I am signing off and deleting my account as of this post. My friends can messenger me, text me, or call me. If that is too difficult, you were never my friend to start with. This is the last post and last time I will open FB.

A daughter of Pastini told the Times her father was an experienced aviator. But she declined to say why he changed his name.

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