Bettie Jones’ son thanks Chicago top cop for recommending Robert Rialmo be fired

CHICAGO -- The son of a Bettie Jones, who was shot and killed by Officer Robert Rialmo in 2015, thanked the police superintendent for reversing his decision and recommending that the cop be fired.

Jones, 55, and Quintonio LeGrier, 19, were fatally shot by Rialmo Dec. 26, 2015 during a domestic disturbance call. Jones was standing in a doorway behind LeGrier.

Jones' son son spoke before the police board Thursday evening and thanked CPD Supt. Eddie Johnson for reversing his decision on the shooting.

Johnson had initially called the shooting justified and within department policy, but earlier this month, Johnson changed his mind, recommending Rialmo be fired for violating multiple department rules, including incompetency and unlawful and unnecessary use of a weapon.

"To hear the city is now recommending the firing of Rialmo we can move forward with peace and closure to hold onto in this life sentence of pain since she was taken from us. May God god bless our city with peace and justice to be served whether you're behind the badge or not. Thank you," Anthony Jones, Jones' son, said.

The police board has scheduled an initial hearing on the the potential Rialmo firing on Dec. 4.

On June 27, the judge presiding over the wrongful death lawsuit against Rialmo for the fatal shooting of LeGrier reversed a jury finding in favor of the teen's family.

The Cook County jury awarded $1.05 million to LeGrier's parents, Janet Cooksey and Antonio LeGrier. The family was asking for $12-$25 million. However, Judge Rena Marie Van Tine reversed the decision after learning the jury also found Rialmo feared for his life when responding to a call of a disturbance. The judge's decision meant that the family will not get any money.

In making their decision, jurors signed a special interrogatory finding that Rialmo fired in reasonable fear of death or great bodily harm. Van Tine found the interrogatory outweighed the decision for LeGrier's estate and found in Rialmo's favor.

Jurors deliberated for about three and a half hours before reaching a verdict in the wrongful death civil lawsuit.