Chicago-area residents share experiences of everyday racism

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It seems almost daily there's a new video of people being questioned for shopping, sitting, or napping while black. These incidents are raising new concerns about racial profiling. In this WGN Cover Story on everyday racism, reporter Gaynor Hall talks to Chicago area residents about what they've experienced on the streets, on campuses and in the workplace.

On May 29, Starbucks is closing thousands of coffee shops for racial bias training for employees. The company has instituted a new policy that you don't have to purchase anything to use their bathrooms or sit in their stores.

Previous research found a few hours of diversity and inclusion training may not stick, especially when it comes to quick decision making. So training should also be coupled with meaningful changes in policy, procedures and hiring.

Last month, an investigation by New York Times Magazine found that black mothers and babies in the U.S. are dying at more than double the rate of white mothers and babies. They discovered the reason is not because of poor health care or lifestyles, but the stress of being a black woman in America.

Producer Pam Grimes and Photojournalists Mike D'Angelo, Brad Piper, Kevin Doellman, and Jeff Armstrong contributed to this report.

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