CPS teachers marching again in push for school funding

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CHICAGO --Today was one of two imposed 'furlough days for CPS teachers--which they turned into a day of action calling it a “Fight Back Day.”

Hundreds on union members along with parents and students converged on City Hall and the Thompson Center and called for progressive funding options for Chicago Public Schools.

While state Democrats are fighting for a revised funding formula that would give more money to Chicago Public Schools, Gov Rauner fired back in an op-ed piece published today saying, in part:

To hold suburban and downstate taxpayers hostage in an attempt to sneak in a new school funding formula that would disproportionately send more money to CPS will not solve our inequitable funding formula for the long term.

Today the Chicago Board of Ed also filed an unfair labor practice charge against the Chicago Teachers Union after CTU suspended members who did not participate in the walk-out on April 1st, a one day strike.

On the April walkout issue CPS CEO Forest Claypool said:

Teachers came to work on April 1 because their calling is educating their students. These dedicated professionals should not be expelled for exercising their right to refuse participation in an illegal strike – especially when they came to school to put their students first.

Claypool went on to say teachers have a right under state labor laws to refuse to engage in a potentially illegal strike and that by moving to discipline these teachers, CTU is “doubling down on illegal conduct.”

CTU says these teachers can re-join the union by paying them the money they made working on April 1st.

The teachers union is still negotiating a new contract and says if a funding solution is not reached before fall expect a strike.

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