PROGRAMMING NOTE: ‘Stories of Hope: Facing Breast’ cancer airs on WGN at 7PM tonight

Starbucks barista with autism serves your drinks with a side of dance moves

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

TORONTO — A Starbucks barista makes amazing lattes and wow’s customers with his epic dance moves while doing so.

Sam, a Toronto teen with autism, was worried he would never be able to work behind a coffee bar because of his movement disorder. However, the manager at his local Starbucks believed in him and gave him a shot.

In a viral video posted on Facebook, Sam is showing off some serious dance moves while whipping up Starbucks beverages.

“When he was offered a position to work at Starbucks Sam told his parents that for the first time in his life. That his life had real meaning. Sam was diagnosed with autism and like some people with autism Sam has a movement disorder,” wrote Carly Fleischmann, who posted the video which has now been viewed over 450,000 times.

Carly says Chris Ali, the manager of the Starbucks Sam works in, was the one that encouraged sam to “channel his dance moves.”

Ali told CTV News that Sam’s dance moves were “something that kind of came along,” and that “Sam is a great character and he loves to dance.” He said bringing dance to his routines at work helped Sam focus on settling down some of his movement disabilities, and also boosted his confidence.

“The customers love it. Sam’s been really connecting with the customers, having a great time,” Ali said, adding that many people visit the location specifically to see Sam’s moves.

The viral video shows the teen steaming milk and adding shots of espresso to a coffee cup as he dances and bobs his head to the beat. As he adds steamed milk to the drink, Sam’s manager can be seen dancing in the background.

At the end of the video, they dance together and smile at the camera.

Take a look at the full video in the player above.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.