2-year-old got out while dad was sleeping, now he can’t see his son

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When a Virginia man awoke from a nap, his 2-year-old son missing. The boy was found, but now the father is not allowed to see his son.

Sean Rose told our sister station WTVR what happened:

When his fiance left the house to turn in a job application, Rose got up and locked the front door. He said his son was asleep in his bed.

Rose fell asleep, but when one of his roommates left the house, the chain on the door was left unlocked.

While he was sleeping, Rose’s 2-year-old son some how got out of the house. He said someone saw his son outside just a ways down from his home and called Chesterfield Police.

As a result, Rose was charged with abuse and neglect of a child, which is a felony.

“I can’t come home to my own son because he got out of the house…he just wanted to have fun, he’s an adventurous little boy,” Rose said.

Rose said that he’s not trying to downplay the situation, and wants people to know he loves and cares for his son.

“These are serious things that have happened,” said Rose. “These are things that no parent should have to go through and should prevent.”

Rose said his next court date is October 22.

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32 comments

  • Micheal

    This father must not understand that you do not go to sleep during the day when your child is asleep. He admitted that the child is adventurous, so that is even more reason to be very watchful of him. He also said about he just wanted to have some fun. Does he not realize that his son could have been injured, kidnapped or even worse. I am sorry, but I hope that this father gets punished for what he has done. I am glad that the son was found safe and unharmed and hope that the boy has a wonderful future.

    • Lindsey

      I’m astounded by some of these comments. You can’t just “put him in a crib”! He will climb OUT! If he knows the child is adventurous he should’ve been awake or explained to hisroommates

      • Lindsey

        Children do this all the time, I’m still having trouble with my autistic 4 year old. She’s highly intelligent she can unlock doors, chains, she’s working at mastering the deadbolt. Do we not sleep? Right now we have to push the couch in front of the door and barricade any other possible exit. I think felony charges on this dad is way to harsh.

  • Christina

    I have a very big problem with the harsh judge mental attitudes about this case . Have we forgotten that kids get into things and do wander off ? I think it’s unreasonable to judge this man . His son was asleep when he went down for a nap as we’ll . Accidental things like this used to happen and still do and your neighbors didn’t freak out on you . They did the right thing by calling the cops but I think the persons history needs to be considered before people go overboard in judging someone for something like this that happens by chance . Like the other person who mentioned this : what are you supposed to do ? Never sleep again ? I slept with my toddlers that was for both our sakes because they both we’re escape artists. Luckily no harm done we locked doors better and the one who marched down the street to his friends house (age 5) wearing the emperors clothes made the neighbors laugh instead of wanting to throw us in jail because they knew who we were as people .

  • Reneesg

    Obviously the perfect parents are passing judgement here. Nothing like this will EVER happen to them. Yes charging him with a felony is going above and beyond ridiculous. Must have been another wannabe “perfect parent who doesn’t have any children” who made that decision.

  • tammy

    When my son was 3, we all took a nap. He woke up and wanted to talk to his fireman daddy so he called 911 and asked for daddy……needless to say, I was awaken to 2 policemen ringing my doorbell. My son also walked out of the house at 6 am one morning before we woke up. We got a keyed deadbolt after that. We protect our kids but when we fail, we learn from our mistakes…..think its wrong to charged like he was!

  • Pat

    A reminder what the article said. He locked the door. And took a nap after the child was asleep. The ROOMMATE unlocked the door and left. The child would not of gotten out if the ROOMMATE had not unlocked the door and left. The door was unlocked and the father was unaware of this fact until he woke up. So the father had been responsible and locked the door. I think society is to harsh and judgmental. I was driving one day in an affluent society, I was about seventeen. I saw a baby crawling on the side of the road. I went up to the nearest house and the lady said that baby belongs next door. I took it next door and the lady said ” oh thank you I was looking for her. I was unpacking some boxes and she must of pushed open the screen and got out.” This was years ago. I never even thought to take the child to the police station. I was just happy the mother got her child back. I told her,” you may want to lock the screen next time .” And she agreed with me. In this case the roommate should of woke the dad and told him he was leaving so he could relock the door. Or lock it from the outside.

  • Jackie

    There might be more information to the story than we know; was the father under the influence at the time, or are the child’s parents divorced and was he visiting with his father? I feel sad for the father, but we don’t have all the details. Hopefully, someone reading this story will take precautions so it doesn’t happen to anyone else.

  • Plochmann

    In a healthy society the neighbor would have known the kid and father and simply picked the kid up and brought him home. Or the room mate would have been more aware and locked the door. The father is the least of problems here, all parents have gone to nap at the same time as their child, from age 2-18 this is an issue and if you think locking kids up is humane, then you should be the ones in North Korea.

  • Sue

    Is this the first incident? Well, guess what here in good old Illinois ( McHenry) he’d be still with his child. Why do I say this this because I have a neighbor who has twin girls 2 1/2 years old, the first time they got out is while mommy slept and it was later in the morning and they both were playing by railroad tracks down the road a bit and someone who lived by those tracks called the police. They walked these girls back home to her. The second time that know about was when my son told me while I was in the shower that we were surrounded by police and I got dressed in time to see mom being handcuffed and put away in the police car, she was lucky her brother was visiting her at the time and was able to keep the girls at home until she was bailed out. DCFS did get involved and came to tell them how they needed to make sure the doors were properly locked. Now there were 2 more incidents where the girls had gotten out while mom was asleep/past out, the first time I had seen them they were outside by the car and I asked them where’s mom they pointed to the door and I assumed that mom was getting her purse and would be out shortly, yes ( shame on me) I thought maybe she had learned her lesson from the other incidents. My husband and I were leaving to go somewhere and elderly neighbor came over asking me whose girls were over playing in the apartment parking lot, that’s when I went over to her apartment door flung it open and screamed out her name twice she sat up and I yelled at her the girls are out next door. She went and got them not saying anything to me, I didn’t expect any thanks from her, my thoughts were with the girls trying to be human and watch out for them. I told the girls father and he said, “she didn’t tell me, well damn why would she ? I tried to give them a fighting chance but, now my husband called me while I was at work to tell me the girls were outside alone again, running from the back door to the front door while it was raining out. She finally woke up and brought them in, yep we should of called DCFS, we didn’t and when the father of the girls came home she was gone and my husband told him they got out again, his reply,” she didn’t tell me”…I give up, I can’t believe his reply again, next escape DCFS !!!

  • Suzanne

    Why didn’t the neighbor just bring the child home? We say we don’t want a police state, but then feel that they should take care of everything. What happened to looking out for one another?

    • Jackie

      That’s what I wondered. I think there’s more to this story than the father told. Perhaps it’s happened before and the neighbor was concerned for the child’s welfare. Or, the father could have been intoxicated. I am just speculating.

  • Liz

    Being a mom of four, I have seen/ heard this numerous times by different families. Just last week at a party this 2 yr old playing with family and friends,Kept heading for the door. Unfortunately it was at a hall so we couldn’t lock the door. Another time my niece left the house while her grandmother was steps away washing dishes. Kids are quick. After that the doors had safety knob covers. Fortunately none of my kids went through that phase but its still possible. I believe it was a mistake. Not the parents fault. It happens. Learn from it. With all the people out there who need their kids taken away for good reason and still have their kids. That’s what needs to be focused on. No one was hurt. Thank god!

  • emilia perez

    I think they r being way to hard oon this mman a mother and any parent for that matter knows that things like this sometimes happen doesn’t make him a bad parent it just happened . things do happen as parents we make mistakes its a part of parenthood no parent can say they have not made mistakes if u as a parent say u have never made a mistake our full of $#*÷×!!!!

  • fred up

    Hey, anonymous… good to see you’re engaged in the issue and not just worrying about yourself. Next time you write a masterpiece, look up narcissism. Then copy your work and send it to yourself certified mail.

  • Susan

    Shit happens, children get out of the house, the yard, wonder off in a store, it is their nature to discover this world and push the limits. All parents have experienced these things at least once. If it is a one time thing, then it is not abuse or neglect, it’s life, and Jo reason to charge someone. We give DCFS to much power, and they are not accountable to anyone. If they can take your children away for this, imagine how much worse they will get.

  • nika

    My son got out the house while me and dad were sleeping. We layd him down for a nap .we both works night shift so we were tired. The door was locked son had been to the park already that morning .we always take him out feed him n bath but he end up getting out while we were napping someone found him call the police n we wake up to a knock at the door. We were both charged with child endangerment. We don’t have a record n are very good parents I just find this wrong. I got chain put up safety gates put up Changed my shift to days did everything I could but the judge didn’t care he was 1 1\2 had no idea he could do this.

  • nika

    Things happen you know to the guy this happen to I’m sorry ur going threw this they went far by giving u a felony we got a miserminer I just hope to be able to get this of my record nava been n trouble but that didn’t matter it wasn’t like I wasn’t there smh just gone pray about it n leave it alone

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