Posture on Point

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Take a moment to consider how you feel reading this blog. Are your shoulders rolled forward? Do you have a strain in your neck? Maybe you even have a dull headache.

The common denominator here is posture. We met up with Brittaney McGary at “On Your Mark” gym to figure out how we can straighten ourselves out. The first tip she gave was to walk like you have a book on top of your head.

  1. Pull your chin back
  2. Have your ears right over your shoulders
  3. Roll your shoulders back
  4. Have your palms facing toward your side

Not exactly natural feeling, is it? That’s because we’ve conditioned out muscles to behave a certain way. But since nobody likes the potbelly look, we can condition our muscles again to do the exact opposite. Brittaney says that the more we hold our muscles in a good muscle position, the more natural it will begin to feel to maintain that position. “Y” and “T” exercises promote good posture, strengthening our muscles so that eventually we won’t even have to think about correcting bad posture. Our muscles will simply know where to go.

Not only will you look better as you stroll down the grocery aisle, but your newly found strength will also help protect against injuries such as should impingement, strains in your upper neck, and headaches.

In addition to the exercise in our segment, Brittaney gave us one more way to improve our posture by stretching our pectoral muscles.

  1. Place your palm and forearm flat against a wall, elbow shoulder-height. Take a step forward to stretch the pectoral muscles, repeat five reps, holding for 10-15 seconds

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