Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

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According to CBS News, 25.8 million Americans, a little over 8% of the population, have diabetes. The most common form is type 2 diabetes which the CDC says accounts for 90-95% of all diabetes cases. While the statistics are high, sometimes pre-diabetes is not diagnosed until it’s too late.

Local Chicago resident Samantha Rappa began rapidly gaining weight in 2009 and started to experience other health issues. A visit with her doctor revealed she was in a pre-diabetic state and on the path to developing type 2 diabetes if she did not change her lifestyle. Rappa changed her diet, began to exercise, and within nine months had reversed her symptoms.

A key to prevention is awareness, so it’s important to know the signs of type 2 diabetes. Symptoms can include blurry vision, excess thirst, fatigue, hunger, frequent urination, and/or weight loss. Because some people do not show any warning signs, it’s important to have regular checkups, especially if you are at-risk.

Like Samantha, it is possible to reverse the effects of type two diabetes if caught early. According to the CDC, the Diabetes Prevention Program found that people can delay and even prevent the onset of type two diabetes by losing a small amount of weight (5-7% of your total body weight). Moderate exercise for 30 minutes five days a week and eating a balanced, low fat diet are great ways to stay healthy and help reduce the risk of developing type two diabetes.

For more information on type two diabetes, as well as prevention tips, please visit the following websites:

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002194/

http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/diabetes-prevention/DA00127

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57554976/rising-type-2-diabetes-rates-linked-to-increases-in-high-fructose-corn-syrup-consumption/

http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/AAG/ddt.htm