Story Summary

Wrigley Field renovation

The Ricketts Family, which owns the Cubs, say they’ll pay the $300-million to rehab Wrigley Field, if some city restrictions are lifted.

Some of their plans include erecting more signs at the park to help raise more revenue; but new signs could block the view of the field from some of the neighbors’ rooftop clubs.

The Cubs also want to add night games and build a hotel in the neighborhood; both proposals raise issues of added traffic congestion, scarce parking, and public safety.

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Chicago’s City Council Zoning Committee will get an earful from Wrigleyville residents today when it considers the Cubs’ plan to renovate Wrigley Field.

Alderman Tom Tunney has dropped his opposition to the Cubs’ plans; but he wants assurances that the owners will address some of his concerns about their changes to the ballpark and the surrounding neighborhood.

Neighbors want the Cubs to change their plan to have a new hotel open out onto a residential street.

They also want the club to drop its plan for a pedestrian bridge between the hotel and the ballpark.

Assuming the Zoning Committee endorses the Wrigley renovation plan, the full City Council could give it final approval Wednesday.

The Cubs $500-million plan to renovate Wrigley field could win final approval from the city council this week.

wrigleyThe city’s zoning committee is scheduled to vote on the plan Tuesday. If approved, it goes before the full city council Wednesday.

Wrigleyville alderman Tom Tunney said Thursday he had “no objections” to the plans, but he has sent an e-mail to fellow aldermen later Thursday saying there are unresolved issues that need to be addressed, before he supports the plan at the zoning meeting.

The Chicago Plan Commission approved the half-billion dollar plan to renovate Wrigley Field.

The plan, which was approved by the city’s landmarks commission last week, includes  a 5,700 square foot sign with LED lights in left field and a roughly 650 square-foot sign in right field.

The Ricketts Family, which owns the Cubs, say they’ll pay the $300 million to rehab Wrigley Field, if some city restrictions are lifted.

Some of the ballpark’s neighbors oppose the plan, which also includes a pedestrian bridge over Clark Street. They also want the Cubs to change their plans for a new hotel.

After Thursday afternoon’s vote, Mayor Emanuel released a statement saying, “I’m pleased this next important step has been taken to help ensure the Cubs can modernize Wrigley Field and bring investments to Lakeview that will benefit residents and Cubs fans alike.

I want to thank the Plan Commission for its careful consideration and Alderman Tunney who has once again proven that he’s a fighter for the residents of his ward, delivering numerous wins for the community including increased security, free remote parking, a new traffic plan, and nearly $5 million in community investments; and finally the Chicago Cubs for their commitment to Chicago and to their neighborhood.”

The Chicago Plan Commission takes a critical vote Thursday on the Wrigley Field renovation plan.

Some of the ballpark’s neighbors gathered Wednesday night to ask the city to take its time reviewing the entire Wrigleyville development plan.

They oppose the Cubs’ plan to add signs and build a pedestrian bridge over Clark St.

They also want the Cubs to change their plans for a new hotel.

Ald. Tom Tunney, 44th Ward, is threatening to vote “no” on the Wrigleyville redevelopment unless changes are made.

The Chicago Plan Commission takes a critical vote today on the Wrigley Field renovation plan.

The Chicago City Council typically approves any plan that clears the Plan Commission.

Some of the ballpark’s neighbors gathered Wednesday evening to ask the city to take more time to review the entire Wrigleyville development plan.

They oppose the Cubs’ plan to add signs and build a pedestrian bridge over Clark Street; they also want the Cubs to change their plans for a new hotel.

Alderman Tom Tunney is threatening to vote “no” on the Wrigleyville redevelopment unless big changes are made.

But it’s unclear at this point whether Tunney’s opposition will be enough to derail or delay the project.

The signage debate at Wrigley Field has cleared the first of several hurdles in this very long race. The Cubs got a unanimous green light from Landmark Commissioners to place signs of substantial proportions in right and left fields.

The Landmarks Commission, appointed by Mayor Emanuel himself,  approved  a 5700 square foot sign with LED lights in left field and a roughly 650 square foot sign in right field.

The new jumbo-tron will tower over the old scoreboard you see in the outfield now.  It will be nearly three times its size.

The mayor released a statement saying in part, “I’m pleased the next step in the process is completed to ensure the Cubs can modernize Wrigley Field and that Wrigleyville has the investments and protections that the neighborhood needs.”

WGN is told The Cubs can expect a lawsuit to be filed against them for violating their agreement with rooftop owners.  It’s an agreement due to expire in a decade or so.

The next hurdle will be with the planning commission, then the full city council will vote on the $500 million plan to improve Wrigley Field and the area around it.

Some of the most iconic parts of Wrigley Field could include advertisements.

That’s part of the Chicago Cubs’ plan to add revenue so ownership could fund the renovation of Wrigley Field.

Under a plan that’s already approved by the city Landmarks Commission, the amount of ad space at Wrigley could be double of what it is now.

The plan includes putting a corporate name, in white letters, on the clock at the top of the scoreboard above center field.

There may also be ads installed on the lights next to the clock.

That’s not the only place in the outfield that could get more signs.

Ads could be installed on the basket that lines the top of the ivy-covered wall.

Corporate logos could also cover the doors on that same wall.

These sign proposals are in addition to the requested 6,000 square foot video board above left field and the 1,000 square foot sign above right field.

The Wrigley Field renovation plan is scheduled to be considered by the city Plan Commission on July 18.

The Chicago Cubs’ plan to renovate Wrigley Field received approval on several aspects today from the Chicago Landmarks Commission, but not on the controversial jumbotron screen in left field or the advertising sign in right field.

Meeting in the council chamber at City Hall, the commission voted to approve 45,000 square feet of new or existing signs around the ball park.

However, as to the big signs in left and right field, the landmark commission put-off a vote until next month.

Also, Alderman Tom Tunney who represents the area now says the Cubs should forget about their idea to extend the right and left field walls due to public safety concerns.

Tunney added that for most of the year,  Wrigley field is a residential community and that sidewalk width is a public safety concern.

The Chicago Cubs’ sweeping, but controversial $500 million plan to modernize and expand historic Wrigley Field goes before the Commission on Chicago Landmarks Thursday.

The commission is only looking at the proposals that are directly connected to the stadium. It will consider plans to expand the outfield walls along Waveland and Sheffield Avenues, the bleachers, bullpens, concourses, and dugouts. Before the hearing began, the commission decided to discuss the massive jumbotron and ad sign for its next meeting on July 11th.

“From the Landmarks perspective, it looks fine. I’ve seen the preliminary plans, and it meets the criteria. So, I’m okay with it,” said Rafael Leon, Chairman of the Chicago Landmarks Commission.

The Cubs are hoping to install a 6,000 square foot jumbotron in left field, and a 1,000 square foot ad in the right field.

The sizes are reasons for concerns.

“It’s important to understand just how big those signs are. One of the signs is larger than most homeowners’ property in the City of Chicago,” said Mary Ann Smith of the Chicago Landmarks Commission.

The hearing comes a day after Ald. Tom Tunney sent a letter to the Cubs making several demands, including reducing the sizes of the jumbotron and ad sign.

WGN News Writer C. Hayes published this story.

The Chicago Commission on Landmarks meets today to begin reviewing the Cubs’ plan to renovate Wrigley Field,  but already Wrigleyville’s alderman wants changes in the plan.

Alderman Tom Tunney sent a letter to the Cubs’ owners Wednesday, demanding that new giant signs in left and right field be one-third smaller than what the team is proposing.

Tunney also wants the Cubs to eliminate a plan for a pedestrian bridge over Clark St. between the ballpark and a new hotel; and he wants the hotel entrance to be on Addison or Clark, not on a residential street, as it would be under the current proposal.

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