Story Summary

Ex-Cook Co. Commissioner Beavers convicted, Moore to replace

Cook County Commissioner William Beavers was convicted of tax evasion but says he will fight it, claiming the judge was unfair and the charges trumped up.

Federal prosecutors claim Beavers, a former police officer and Chicago Alderman, took $225,000 from campaign funds he controlled, spent the money on personal things, and did not pay taxes on the money over a 3-year period.

They claim Beavers also did not pay taxes on $69,000 he put into a retirement fund, which doubled his monthly pension.

It took a jury less than an hour or two to convict him on all counts.

Cook County Democratic Committeemen chose Stanley Moore as his replacement.

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Former Cook County Commissioner William Beavers reports to prison Monday to begin a six-month sentence for tax evasion.

Beavers’ last-ditch efforts to remain free failed; his attorneys argued he was a life-long public servant who didn’t pose a flight risk, and they asked that he remain free while they appeal his conviction.

On Tuesday, a federal judge rejected the bid, saying Beavers hasn’t shown any reason to believe his appeal would result in a reversal or new trial; the next day an appeals court refused to push back Beavers’ surrender date.

By the time the court hears oral arguments in Beavers’ appeal in late February, Beavers will have already completed half of his sentence.

The former Chicago alderman and Cook County Commissioner is serving time for failing to pay taxes on hundreds of thousands of dollars he took from his campaign funds.

During the trial, prosecutors alleged Beavers used those funds like a piggybank — gambling with much of the money at Horseshoe Casino in Hammond, Indiana.

Beavers must also pay a $10,000 fine, perform 400 hours of community service and refrain from gambling for one year after his release.

Since his arrest, Beavers has maintained that the feds came after him only because he refused to wear a wire in an investigation of fellow County Board member John Daley.

Beavers’ lawyer Sam Adam Jr. tells WGN-TV, he expects Beavers will arrive at the Minnesota prison by 1 p.m.

Former Cook County Commissioner  William “Big Bill” Beavers must report to prison on Monday.

He lost his bid for bail Tuesday while he appeals his fraud conviction.

A federal judge saying the defense arguments have no merit and aren’t likely to succeed.

The 78-year-old Beavers faces six months behind bars.

He was convicted of not paying taxes on hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign funds, that he used as a personal piggy bank for things like casino gambling.

Attorneys for former Cook County Commissioner William Beavers will go to court today, to ask a judge to allow him to remain free on bond pending appeal.

Beavers was sentenced to six months in prison after being convicted of tax evasion, for failing to repay money he took from his campaign funds for personal use.

He was ordered to surrender next month.

But, his attorneys will ask Judge James Zagel to allow him to stay home until their appeal of the conviction is sorted out.

The prison population needs to make room for another corrupt, Chicago politician.

Former Cook County Commissioner and ex-Chicago alderman William Beavers is sentenced Wednesday to six months in prison for failing to pay taxes on thousands of dollars he took from his campaign fund, and then spending it on gambling and other personal expenses.

chi-commissioner-william-beavers-goes-on-trial-001

Photo courtesy of the Chicago Tribune.

He was also sentenced to one year supervision and a $10,000 fine.

Prosecutors wanted him to get a 21 month prison sentence.

Beavers smiled upon hearing his sentence, and cracked a joke afterwards as to why he didn’t ask the judge for leniency.

“And like I said, I ain’t begging for nothing. I don’t beg my woman. So, you know I wouldn’t go beg the judge,” said Beavers.

Beavers plans to appeal his sentence.

WGN News Writer C. Hayes published this story.

Former Cook County Commissioner William Beavers will be sentenced today for tax evasion.

A federal jury convicted beavers six months ago.

He was accused of spending campaign money on personal things and not reporting it on his tax returns.

Prosecutors are recommending a 21-month prison sentence, while the defense is seeking probation.

Beavers told The Sun-Times that he will not beg the judge for leniency.

He says he believes his conviction will be overturned on appeal because of mistakes that the judge made at trial.

Cook County Democratic Committeemen selected businessman Stanley Moore Thursday to replace former Cook County Commissioner William Beavers, who was convicted of federal tax evasion charges last month.

Moore has the support of 21st Ward Alderman Howard Brookins, who has the most votes in the process.

Moore has had his share of controversy. He was investigated by the state Ethics Committee for allegedly campaigning on taxpayer money while he worked for the Illinois Department of Transportation. He was running for a state House seat at the time.

Moore denies that he did anything wrong, but he says he did not have enough money to properly refute the allegations.  He just paid a $3,000 fine in connection with the allegations.

Cook County Democratic Committeemen are meeting today to select a replacement for former Cook County Commissioner William Beavers. who was convicted of federal tax evasion charges last month. william-beavers

A decision is expected by the end of the day.

The leading candidate appears to be businessman Stanley Moore.  Moore has the support of 21st Ward Alderman Howard Brookins, who has the most votes in the process.

Moore has had his share of controversy.  He was investigated by the state Ethics Committee for allegedly campaigning on taxpayer money while he worked for the Illinois Department of Transportation. He was running for a state House seat at the time.

Moore denies that he did anything wrong, but he says he did not have enough money to properly refute the allegations.  He just paid a $3,000 fine in connection with the allegations.

Among the others seeking Beavers’ former County Board seat is former Cook County Board President Todd Stroger.

Cook County Democratic Committee may choose a successor for former Cook County Commissioner William Beavers Thursday.

Former State Transportation Official Stanley Moore is emerging as the favorite.

Moore was forced to leave his job in 2009, after a state ethics commission determined he did political campaign work on state time.

Commissioner Beavers was convicted of tax evasion last month, and ordered to give up his seat.

He is awaiting sentencing.

Cook County Commissioner William Beavers was convicted of tax evasion today but says he will fight, claiming the judge was unfair and the charges trumped up.

It took a jury less than an hour or two to convict him on all counts.

Records show the 78-year-old outspoken Democrat spent 18 days at casinos in some months.  And between 2006 and 2008 he was taking money from his campaign funds and using it for personal expenses or to gamble.  Beavers’s lawyers told the jury he intended to pay it back.

Prosecutors didn’t believe him and neither did the jury.

In court,  Beavers’s attorney said the defendant  had a problem with gambling but he’s no criminal.

Beavers opted not to testify and said the judge never would have let him tell his story, the one where federal agents wanted him to wear a wiretap to catch fellow commissioner John Daley. When he refused, he claims, they went after him.

Beavers now faces three years and $250,000 fine.  He says he wont resign unless he is forced to.

No sentencing date has been set.

A jury found Cook County Commissioner William Beavers guilty on all four counts in his tax evasion case.

He was convicted on one count of corruptly impeding the Internal Revenue Service and three counts of filing a false federal income tax return for 2006, 2007 and 2008.

Federal prosecutors say Beavers spent $226,000 in campaign funds on personal expenses and never paid taxes on it.

They say Beavers also failed to pay taxes on $69,000 in campaign contributions that he placed in a city retirement fund in 2006, in order to more than double his monthly pension.

The defense argued that Beavers amended his tax returns and paid some of the money back to the campaign, in order to prove that it was a loan.

Beavers had claimed that the FBI is only targeting him because he refused to be a “stool pigeon.”

This is a developing story. Check back for details.

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