Story Summary

Shooting at Los Angeles International Airport

The man charged with killing a TSA agent at the Los Angeles International Airport remains in critical condition.

Paul Ciancia, 23, was shot in the face and neck by police.

Ciancia sent suicidal texts to his family in New Jersey and then asked a roommate to drive him to LAX.

Police say he acted alone and had a suicide letter with him at the airport.

Other shooting victims included two other TSA officers and 29-year-old Brian Ludmer of Lake Forest, Illinois.

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A Lake Forest native who was injured in friday’s shooting at Los Angeles International Airport says he will need surgery and extensive therapy.

Brian Ludmer, 29, was shot once in the right calf. The bullet fractured his leg.

Ludmer says he is still hospitalized and will have at least one more surgery.

Ludmer is a teacher in southern California, but grew up in Lake Forest.

He told coworkers that he thought he wasn’t going to survive the shooting, after he hid in a closet and put a tourniquet on his leg.

By David Simpson, CNN

After a weekend of intense investigation, authorities are piecing together more details about Friday’s fatal shooting at Los Angeles International Airport — including the suspect’s behavior earlier in the week and a warning from his family that may have come moments too late.

laxshootingHere is a rundown to get you up to speed:

THE SUSPECT

Paul Ciancia, 23, of Los Angeles is charged with murder of a federal officer and commission of violence in an international airport.

He was shot by officers Friday and was in critical condition at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center Sunday.

A source said Ciancia was unable to speak to investigators.

CLUES OF A MOTIVE

A note found on Ciancia indicated he wanted to kill TSA employees to “instill fear into their traitorous minds,” FBI Special Agent in Charge David Bowdich said.

According to someone who knew Ciancia and his three roommates well, Ciancia began asking for a ride to the airport days before the shooting. He claimed he needed to fly to New Jersey to help his sick father, but he never said what day he needed to leave, the source said.

On Friday, Ciancia burst into a roommate’s room and demanded a ride to the airport immediately, said the source, who spoke to CNN on condition of anonymity.

The roommate obliged. Investigators don’t think the roommate had any idea of Ciancia’s plans.

THE NEAR SAVE

At around the same time, Ciancia was sending text messages to family members in Pennsville, New Jersey.

Ciancia has no known history of mental illness, but he said in the texts that he was unhappy. And one message suggested something bad would happen.

That alarmed Ciancia’s father enough to call Pennsville Police Chief Allen Cummings. Cummings, in turn, called Los Angeles police and asked them to check on Ciancia.

Perhaps 45 minutes after Ciancia left for the airport, officers arrived at his apartment, said Rep. Michael McCaul, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee. The two roommates at home did not know where Ciancia and the other roommate had gone.

THE ATTACK

About 9:20 a.m. Friday, Ciancia walked up to a Transportation Security Administration checkpoint in Terminal 3. He pulled a .223-caliber assault rifle from a bag and shot TSA officer Gerardo Hernandez “at point-blank range,” according to a court document filed by an FBI agent.

Ciancia then went up an escalator but returned to shoot Hernandez again, apparently after seeing him move.

He continued walking and shooting. Witnesses said he went from person to person, asking, “Are you TSA?”

“I just shook my head,” traveler Leon Saryan told CNN’s Anderson Cooper. “And he kept going.”

THE VICTIMS

Hernandez, 39, was the first TSA officer to die in the line of duty since the agency was created in 2001.

“He took pride in his duty for the American public and for the TSA mission,” his wife, Ana Hernandez, told reporters.

The couple, who married in 1998, had two children.

Two other TSA officers — James Speer, 54, and Tony Grigsby, 36 — were wounded but were released from the hospital.

A traveler who was shot in the leg, 29-year-old Brian Ludmer of Lake Forest, Illinois, was in fair condition Sunday

THE POLICE RESPONSE

TSA officers are unarmed. So Ciancia was eventually shot multiple times in the chest by airport police officers.

Airport Police Chief Patrick Gannon said the FBI told him his officers were 60 seconds behind Ciancia. He praised their response, even though he acknowledged that he had moved his officers away from positions inside the checkpoints during the past year.

“The threat … at the airport does not exist behind security at that podium, the threat exists from the curbline on,” Gannon said. “So … we have our people stationed throughout the airport.”

WHAT’S NEXT?

If convicted, Ciancia could face the death penalty or life in prison without parole. The U.S. attorney general would decide whether to pursue a death sentence.

TSA Administrator John Pistole said the shooting has prompted a review of security protocol with partner agencies.

McCaul said better coordination with local law enforcement could improve security at checkpoints.

But the congressman acknowledged that “it’s very difficult to stop these types of attacks.”

“It’s almost like an open shopping mall,” he said.

TM & © 2013 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

A true explanation of why a gunman unleashed terror at Los Angeles International Airport may lie in the hospital bed of Paul Ciancia. But no secrets are coming out.

The man authorities believe killed a TSA agent and shot three other people Friday was “unresponsive” after airport police shot him to end the carnage, FBI Special Agent in Charge David Bowdich said Saturday.

But even in Ciancia’s silence, more details are trickling out about what happened at the bustling airport Friday.

Ciancia walked up to a security checkpoint, fatally shot a TSA officer “at point-blank range,” went up an escalator and then came back down to shoot his victim again with an assault rifle, a federal prosecutor said.

That TSA officer, Gerardo Hernandez, later died.

After shooting Hernandez, the gunman continued through the terminal, hitting two other uniformed TSA officers and a passenger with bullets before he was shot by airport police, U.S. Attorney Andre Birotte Jr. said.

Both wounded TSA officers were treated and released from hospitals, but the passenger who was shot in his leg was still being treated Sunday at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center Sunday, according to a hospital statement.

Brian Ludmer “remains in fair condition but faces at least one additional surgery for a fractured leg along with extensive physical therapy,” a hospital spokesman said Sunday.

Ludmer, a 29-year-old Lake Forest, Illinois, native, called his mother as he was being admitted to the hospital Friday, his mother told CNN affiliate WBBM-TV .

“He said don’t worry, I am going to be OK,” she said as she waited at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport for a flight to Los Angeles.

Ludmer teaches stage craft in the theater program at Calabasas HIgh School in Los Angeles County, according to the school’s website.

‘Conscious decision to kill … TSA employees’

Ciancia, 23, is now charged with two felony offenses — murder of a federal officer and commission of violence in an international airport. He remained in critical condition at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center Sunday, the hospital said.

If convicted, Ciancia could face the death penalty or life in prison without parole, the prosecutor said. The U.S. attorney general would decide whether to pursue a death sentence.

The gunman left behind five magazines of ammunition that Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said “could have literally killed everyone in that terminal.”

He also had a note that apparently referred to the New World Order and anti-government claims, a federal law enforcement official said.

It’s not clear what gave rise to the references, and federal investigators have found no links to known groups and nothing in the suspect’s background to explain them. The New World Order is generally considered to be a conspiracy theory in which people suspect a group of elites is conspiring to form an authoritarian, one-world government.

Bowdich said the handwritten note indicated the suspect made “a conscious decision to kill multiple TSA employees.”

“He addressed them (TSA officers) at one point in the letter and stated that he wanted to ‘instill fear into their traitorous minds,’” Bowdich said.

In his diatribe, the gunman claimed the TSA treats Americans like terrorists even though all people aren’t equally dangerous, a U.S. law enforcement official said.

And near the end of the note was a derogatory reference to Janet Napolitano, the former head of the Department of Homeland Security, which includes TSA, the official said.

Another clue about Ciancia’s state of mind came from his family in New Jersey. Family members became concerned in recent days after Ciancia sent his brother and father “angry, rambling” texts venting about the government, living in Los Angeles and his general unhappiness, an intelligence source said.

‘A wonderful husband, father’

Hernandez is the first TSA officer to die in the line of duty since the agency was founded in 2001. He was working as a travel document checker at the time, the TSA workers’ union said.

He would have turned 40 next week. His widow described him as a “wonderful husband, father, brother, son and friend.”

The chaos also affected more than 165,000 passengers on hundreds of flights as the airport shut down for hours. By Saturday afternoon, all of it — including Terminal 3 — had been reopened.

Placement of police questioned

The shooting has stirred questions about a recent repositioning of airport police officers around LAX.

Airport police Chief Patrick Gannon said in the past year, he decided to move officers from behind a TSA security checkpoint to in front of it, where they also took on “greater responsibilities” such as monitoring both the arrival and departure floors of the terminal.

“The threat … at the airport does not exist behind security at that podium, the threat exists from the curbline on,” Gannon said. “So … we have our people stationed throughout the airport.”

He said the nearest police officer to the site of Friday’s initial shooting “was just moved to the front part of the airport.”

Gannon acknowledged the trade-off of having the officers roam a larger area rather than sit at a checkpoint.

“So are they going to be in the exact same (place), exactly where I’d hoped they would be? No,” he said. “It didn’t happen in this particular case.”

TSA Administrator John Pistole said the shooting has prompted a review of security protocol with partner agencies.

Congressman speaks out

U.S. House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Michael McCaul said better coordination between TSA officers and local law enforcement at the nation’s airports could help improve security at those locations.

He made the remarks Sunday on CNN’s State of the Union.

“I talked to the director of TSA, John Pistole, yesterday. We talked about a review of the policies at airports. Every airport is a little bit different, but the coordination with the local police is key because remember, TSA officers are not armed,” the Texas Republican said.

McCaul said that in the accounts he’s read about the incident, the gunman “shot the TSA officer who was checking documents, went up an escalator, came back down, shot him again and went through the security point.”

“I think it’s important we have the local law enforcement really at different points at the airport to protect not only the perimeter, but also things that could happen through security checkpoint,” he said.

He also talked about the importance of using special TSA VIPR teams, short for Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response. The teams are tasked with performing random, unpredictable baggage and security checks at transportation venues.

McCaul said Pistole wants to further use such teams at airports “to make sure American people are safe and the traveling public are safe when they go to our airports. I think that better coordination with local law enforcement should help tremendously.

“However, having said that, it’s very difficult to stop these types of attacks. Anybody can show up, as we saw in the Navy Yard with the shotgun.” He was referring to the September attack at the Navy Yard in Washington.

“It’s almost like an open shopping mall,” he said, “so very difficult to protect.”
TM & © 2013 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

Los Angeles (CNN) — It’s not clear why a 23-year-old man, identified by the FBI as Paul Anthony Ciancia, stormed of America’s busiest airports, but it is clear he was dangerous.

And investigators were digging into his background to find out clues about his motives.

He had enough ammunition to “have literally killed everyone in that terminal,” Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said.

Whatever the reason, the suspect, armed with what police say was an assault rifle, opened fire in Los Angeles International Airport’s Terminal 3, killing one and sending dozens scattering before he was wounded and captured.

One clue to the suspect’s intentions came from witnesses of the mayhem.

Some said the gunmen asked people, “Hey, are you TSA?” — the acronym for the Transportation Security Administration. If they said “no,” he would move on.

One of those questioned travelers was Leon Saryan. He told CNN’s Anderson Cooper that the same man he’d just seen shoot a TSA officer “calmly” walked toward him and asked, “TSA?”

“I just shook my head,” Saryan said. “And he kept going.”

The materials found on the suspect included a rant that appeared to reference the New World Order as well as anti-TSA and anti-government claims, a federal law enforcement official said Saturday.

It’s not clear what gave rise to the references, and federal investigators have found no known links to known groups or anything in the suspect’s background to explain them. The New World Order is generally considered to be a conspiracy theory in which people suspect a group of elites are conspiring to form an authoritarian, one-world government.

The incident disrupted flights and inconvenienced passengers. As of Saturday morning, Terminal 3 remained closed, and it was unclear when it would reopen.

In a message on Twitter on Saturday morning, the airport said that from the start of the incident around 9:30 am Friday through midnight, an estimated 1,550 scheduled flights with about 167,050 passengers were “impacted.”

An officer killed

The TSA officer killed was the first employee of that relatively new agency to be killed in the line of duty. The agency identified him as Gerardo Hernandez, who would have turned 40 next week. He was working as a travel document checker at the time of the shooting, according to TSA workers’ union and federal sources.

Two other TSA officers were also shot, one in the leg, authorities said.

The suspected gunman was detained after being shot in the chest multiple times, according to an intelligence source briefed by Los Angeles police. As of Friday evening, he was receiving medical attention at a hospital, according to FBI Special Agent in Charge David Bowdich.

Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center said that it received three male victims — one in critical condition and two in fair condition. One of the two in fair condition suffered gunshot wounds, while another had an unspecified injury, said Dr. Lynne McCullough, an emergency physician at the Los Angeles hospital. One of them was released by Friday afternoon; one of the others who remained at the hospital was Ciancia, according to the intelligence source.

Two other patients were transported to Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, said David Klurad, a trauma surgeon there.

Klurad described one as a “middle-aged” person with minor injuries from being shot in the shoulder. The other had no signs of life when he arrived at the hospital, the surgeon added.

Family concerns

Another clue to Ciancia’s state of mind came from his family. He lives in Los Angeles, but his family back in New Jersey were concerned about him, said Allen Cummings, chief of police in Pennsville, New Jersey.

Ciancia’s family became concerned in recent days after he sent his brother and father “angry, rambling” texts venting about the government, living in Los Angeles and his unhappiness generally, an intelligence source said.

But despite the unsettling text, Ciancia’s family was still surprised by Friday’s events.

Terror in the terminal

The shooting caused what airport police Chief Patrick Gannon described as a “large amount of chaos.”

People ran for their lives and took shelter wherever they could as authorities pursued the gunman.

Chuck Ocheret was among those in the busy airport when he heard two “loud pops.”

“Then I heard this mad rush of people, and there was a stampede of people coming from this direction,” Ocheret said. “Nobody really knew what was going on.”

An otherwise normal day in the airport’s Terminal 3 turned upside down around 9:20 a.m. (12:20 p.m. ET), as the suspect approached a checkpoint.

There, he “pulled an assault rifle out of a bag and began to open fire,” Gannon said.

Passenger Saryan had just cleared the TSA checkpoint and was reaching for his shoes and belt when shots rang out, prompting “everybody (to) hit the ground and … run.” A TSA officer grabbed Saryan’s shoes and started running alongside him, before the gunman grazed the officer with a bullet.

“I went and cowered in a corner,” Saryan said.

The suspect kept moving down Terminal 3, equipped with three magazines for his weapon, according to the intelligence source briefed by Los Angeles police. He began running down Terminal 3.

He had company. Gannon said two officers from his department responded “within seconds after the shooting started” and ran off in pursuit of the suspect.

Traveler Vernon Cardenas was sitting at one end of the terminal, when he heard noise and saw a mass of people running toward him. He and others bolted through a kicked-open exit door and ran onto the tarmac — believing it was safer there.

The circular area where Cardenas had been is where the bloodshed finally ended with the gunman’s shooting by law enforcement, according to the intelligence source. They didn’t take any chances with the wounded suspect either, handcuffing him to a gurney as he was being carried out. Authorities said they found more than 100 rounds of unspent ammunition.

The gunfire was so unexpected and sudden that many panicked passengers ran out of the terminal to safety, leaving their belongings behind.

LAX officials tweeted that passengers would be able to return some time Saturday to pick up the items they discarded in the chaos.

Los Angeles (CNN) — A man armed with what police say was an assault rifle and carrying materials expressing anti-government sentiment opened fire Friday morning at Los Angeles International Airport, killing one person before being chased down himself, authorities said.

Eyewitnesses said the suspect asked people, “Hey, are you TSA?” — the acronym for the Transportation Security Administration — according to a federal law enforcement official. If they said “no,” he would move on.

In the aftermath of the shooting, investigators found information on the suspect expressing not just anti-federal government sentiment but also anger at the TSA specifically, according to the federal law enforcement official.

By then, a TSA officer was dead — the first employee of that relatively new agency to be killed in the line of duty, according to American Federation of Government Employees president J. David Cox.

Two others were also shot, FBI special agent in charge David Bowdich said. At least one of them was a TSA employee who was shot in the leg, according to a former Los Angeles Police Department ranking officer who was briefed by investigators.

The suspected gunman himself was detained after being shot in the chest multiple times, according to an intelligence source briefed by Los Angeles police.

He was identified later by the FBI as Paul Anthony Ciancia, a 23-year-old from Los Angeles. Law enforcement sources told CNN that, in addition to the southern California city, the suspect also had an address in New Jersey.

Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center said that, hours after the incident, it received three male victims — one in critical condition and two in fair condition. One of the two in fair condition suffered gunshot wounds, another suffered an unspecified injury, said Dr. Lynne McCullough, an emergency physician at the Los Angeles hospital.

Two patients were transported to Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, said David Klurad, a trauma surgeon there.

One was what Klurad described as a “middle-aged” person with minor injuries from being shot in the shoulder. The other had no signs of life when he arrived at the hospital, the surgeon added. It wasn’t known if this person was the slain TSA officer.

TSA: Number of guns discovered in airports rising

The episode caused what airport police Chief Patrick Gannon, who had said the shooter used an “assault rifle,” described as a “large amount of chaos.” People ran for their lives and took shelter wherever they could as authorities pursued the gunman.

Chuck Ocheret was among those in the busy airport when he heard two “loud pops.”

“Then I heard this mad rush of people, and there was a stampede of people coming from this direction,” Ocheret told CNN. “Nobody really knew what was going on.”

Still, by Friday afternoon, authorities believes the worst was over. Gannon noted it is believed there was only one shooter.

Source: Gunman had 3 magazines for weapon

An otherwise normal day in the airport’s Terminal 3 turned upside down around 9:20 a.m. (12:20 p.m. ET), as the suspect approached a checkpoint.

There, he “pulled an assault rifle out of a bag and began to open fire,” Gannon said.

The suspect didn’t stop there. Equipped with three magazines for his weapon, according to the intelligence source briefed by Los Angeles police, he began running down Terminal 3.

Traveler Vernon Cardenas was sitting at one end of the terminal, when he heard noise and saw a mass of people running toward him. He and others bolted through a kicked-open exit door and ran onto the tarmac — believing then it was safer there — even with then still-arriving and departing jetliners — than in the concourse above.

The circular area where Cardenas had been is where the bloodshed finally ended with the gunman’s shooting by law enforcement, according to the intelligence source.

Actor Tim Daly said that when he was eventually led out of the the Virgin America first-class lounge, he saw where the incident came to a head around Gates 35 and 36. After being told not to step on any blood or glass, Daly spotted a high-powered rifle on the ground along with three magazines, a pair of black shoes and several bags strewn across the floor.

The episode soon rendered one of the world’s busiest airports a ghost town. Large portions were evacuated as authorities ordered a “ground stop” for arriving places, said police and the Federal Aviation Administration.

Almost every flight scheduled to leave the airport on Friday will be “significantly late,” said Gina Marie Lindsay, executive director of Los Angeles World Airports.

The area around the airport was jammed with cars as police shut down access to the airport.

The airport was still accepting incoming flights, but doing so at less than half the normal rate as a few were rerouted, Lindsay said. Some flights that did arrive sat on the tarmac as the investigation continued.

Police at Los Angeles International Airport announced around 2 p.m. over a loudspeaker that they were going to start allowing workers back into the airport so operations such as processing incoming and outbound flights could resume.

The “ground stop” was expected to finally lift two hours later, the airport tweeted — though even then, hordes of people still lingered on sidewalks outside the airport, with nowhere else to go.

But even when flights resume, parts of Terminal 3 will still be off limits, with flights that were supposed to go in and out of there moved to other terminals in the massive airport.

‘Mayhem is the best I can describe it’

That means travelers essentially had nowhere to go for nearly seven hours, far worse than even the most infuriating of Los Angeles’ epic traffic jams.

Still, the waiting was welcome relative to the pandemonium hours earlier — when Robert Perez told CNN affiliate KCAL/KCBS that people started diving for cover and scores rushed down a staircase.

Recalled Perez: “Everybody started to panic.”

Alex Neumann described the scene as “mayhem,” as people ran and, in some cases, got knocked down.

Even once the suspect was shot and detained, law enforcement officers roamed the airport with guns drawn in search of possible other culprits.

Fast Facts: 25 Deadliest mass shootings in U.S. history

KCAL showed live video of three officers with rifles to their shoulders inspecting parked cars in an open-air parking lot.

At one point, firefighters lay tarps on the street at the airport, apparently for triage. Several ambulances were at the airport, and at least one person was loaded into one.

A U.S. intelligence official “doesn’t see any indications of terrorism” in Friday’s shooting. The intelligence community has been in “constant contact with a range of law enforcement authorities,” according to the official.

President Barack Obama was briefed on the shooting and will continue to be updated, spokesman Jay Carney said. Obama later addressed the issue later while meeting with Iraq’s prime minister, saying he was concerned about the shooting.

Authorities were interviewing about 100 witness, the intelligence source said.

A leader of the union representing TSA officers deplored the incident.

“We are sickened by reports of today’s shooting,” Cox said.

LAX

 [Breaking news update, 2:40 p.m.]

Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center said it received three male victims from Los Angeles International Airport, where shootings occurred Friday. One arrived in critical condition, and two were listed in fair condition, the hospital said. The hospital did not say how they were injured.

[Breaking news update, 2:35 p.m.]

A former Los Angeles Police Department ranking officer gave this account of Friday morning’s shooting, citing discussions with investigators: The shooter walked to the security checkpoint, pulled out a concealed assault rifle and shot the TSA agent; the shooter then went through the checkpoint, and a police officer shot the shooter. The source arrived at the scene shortly after the incident.

[Previous update, 2:30 p.m.]

A gunman concealing an assault rifle walked up to a Los Angeles International Airport checkpoint and opened fire on a TSA agent Friday morning, but when the gunman passed the security point, he was shot and wounded by a police officer, a former ranking Los Angeles Police Department officer who was at the scene told CNN.

The gunfire sent travelers into a stampede, passengers said.

A total of 10 shots were fired, and two people — the gunman and the Transportation Security Administration agent — were wounded and taken to local hospitals, an intelligence source told CNN. Their conditions weren’t immediately available.

It was unclear in the immediate aftermath whether there were other suspects.

The gunman approached a checkpoint at Terminal 3 at 9:30 a.m. and began shooting at the TSA agent, according to the former LAPD officer who was at the scene.

The gunfire and the airport’s announcement of the incident provoked chaos among travelers on a busy morning, passengers said.

One of the busiest airports in the world was rendered a ghost town: The violence prompted evacuations of portions of LAX and led to a “ground stop” for arriving planes, said police and the Federal Aviation Administration.

Robert Perez, who was getting ready to take a Virgin Air flight, was taking a nap in the terminal when pandemonium erupted, he told CNN affiliate KCAL/KCBS.

“I heard a popping sound, and everybody was diving for cover,” Perez told the station. “The TSA said there was a shooting in the terminal and evacuate the building.”

At least 100 people came down a staircase. “Everybody started to panic,” Perez said.

Fox Sports national columnist Bill Reiter was also at the airport during the gunfire. “After the initial burst of gunfire and hiding, people started jumping over one another, jumping off chairs, pushing each other. Chaos & fear,” he said on his Twitter account.

The passengers were directed to board a bus and were taken to a smaller terminal, Perez told the affiliate.

Alex Neumann was at a food court, waiting to travel to Miami, when the incident unfolded. He said Terminal 2 was put into lockdown.

“People were running and people getting knocked down. There was luggage everywhere,” Neumann said. “Mayhem is the best I can describe it.”

Several police officers moved about the airport with guns drawn, he said. KCAL showed live video of three officers with rifles to their shoulders inspecting parked cars in an open-air parking lot.

The Los Angeles Fire Department was assisting with a “multi-patient” incident at Los Angeles International Airport, the department said Friday on Twitter.

Firefighters were laying tarps on the street at the airport, apparently for triage. Several ambulances were at the airport, and at least one person was loaded into one.

The area around the airport was jammed with cars as police shut down access to the airport Friday morning.

President Barack Obama has been briefed on the shooting and will continue to be updated, but the White House had no further information at this time on what happened, spokesman Jay Carney said Friday.

Authorities were interviewing about 100 witness, the intelligence source said.

A leader of the union representing TSA officers deplored the incident.

“We are sickened by reports of today’s shooting,” American Federation of Government Employees National President J. David Cox Sr. said.

 

 

 

TM & © 2013 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

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