Story Summary

Roseland Hospital expected to close

Roseland Community Hospital could be shut down unless the state comes up with about $600,000 to make payroll.

Roseland officials say Gov. Pat Quinn’s office promised them the state would give them the money needed to keep the hospital open, but then recently told them the funding wasn’t available.

Roseland is $7 million in debt.

The state owes the hospital $6 million, but Governor Quinn denies that.

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Roseland Community Hospital will see another day. Late this afternoon, the Governor sent emergency aid its way, a gesture that could be nothing more than a band aid unless administrators get a business plan in place.

Endless rallies, marches and pleas for state aid paid off in the 11th hour. Late this afternoon, Gov Quinn gave the hospital $350,000 dollars, just enough to buy them a few months and handle payroll so staff do not lose their jobs and patients aren’t left in the cold.

The violence in the neighborhood makes Roseland a busy and necessary place on the south side. But the mounting bills crippled the 162 bed operation serving the poor, mostly minorities with little insurance if any at all.

New money from the governor’s office is a start, but hardly the finish. There is a lot of work to do to keep the hospital open for good.

The Governor’s Office released a statement saying, “This temporary relief will allow their doors to remain open and continue to provide critical care services. However, this is not a long-term solution. The hospital must take the necessary steps to develop a plan for a sustainable future.”

But how far will that gift from the state last?  Probably not more than 10 days.

The money comes with conditions that require it to allow independent financial experts to conduct a “comprehensive review of the hospital’s budget, operations and finances,” the state said in a statement. The hospital also is required to bring on an independent chief restructuring officer to oversee the operations and development of a long-term plan to keep Roseland viable.

-Chicago Tribune contributed to this report

The future of Roseland hospital on the far South Side is in question. Roseland CEO, president resign amid questions of mismanagement

The facility is deeply in debt, leaving patients and employees wondering whether the doors can stay open.

Roseland Vice President Sharon Thurman tells WGN 5:00 p.m. Wednesday is the next deadline for the hospital to close.

If the hospital is not promised state money by that time, the doors will close and patients will be transferred.

Members of the hospital staff joined union members and the Rainbow Push Coalition outside the hospital Wednesday.

Demonstrators chanted, “Keep Roseland open!”  They’re pleading with the state to step in and fund the $7 million needed to keep the hospital running.

Thurman says Governor Quinn’s representatives were at the hospital Tuesday but they left without making a financial commitment.  There is still hope the money will be found to keep the hospital’s doors open.

The hospital board will meet Wednesday at 5:00 p.m.  If the state does not come through, the doors will close and plans will be finalized to transfer patients to other hospitals.

Members of Rainbow Push say this is a health crisis for the South Side.  “This is the same community that has experienced schools closing, mental health clinics closing, libraries closing, bus routes being shut down, and fares being raised.  They can’t take the hospital being closed,” said Bishop Tavis Grant.

Another vigil and march is planned for 3:00 p.m. Wednesday afternoon.

Operators of Roseland Community Hospital say they will stay open today, despite the resignation of it’s CEO and President, Dian Powell.

Powell turned in her resignation Tuesday, one day after inaccurately blaming the hospital’s financial shortfall on $6 million in missing payments from the state.   She said the hospital was $7 million in debt.

Powell had threatened the hospital would shut down Wednesday, unless it received some last-minute funding to cover employee payroll this week.

The hospital corrected Powell’s statement, saying the state issued an advance supplemental payment of $958,240 to help keep Roseland afloat.

A hospital vice president now says there are no immediate plans to close following a round of promising talks with Governor Quinn’s office.

But Quinn’s spokesperson Brooke Anderson says the hospital is deep in debt due to serious mismanagement issues.   “Unfortunately, the executives have failed to respond to our requests for a viable plan to properly run the hospital,” Anderson said. “To be clear, the hospital and its board of directors have serious management issues that need to be addressed. Roseland Hospital is in deep debt, and they have mismanaged their resources into the situation they are in today.”

Board Chairman Genivee Chapman was appointed interim CEO.

The CEO and president of Roseland Community Hospital has resigned.

Dian Powell turned in her resignation Tuesday, one day after inaccurately blaming the hospital’s financial shortfall on millions in missing payments from the state.

Powell had threatened the hospital would shut down Wednesday, unless it received some last-minute funding.

A hospital vice president now says there are no immediate plans to close following a round of promising talks with Governor Quinn’s office.

But a spokesperson for the governor says the hospital is deep in debt due to serious mismanagement issues.

The hospital has not named Powell’s replacement.

For more, log on to Chicago Tribune

The fight to save a South Side hospital moved to Chicago’s Loop Tuesday.

Roseland Community Hospital could stop admitting new patients as early as Wednesday.

Roseland community pastors and neighbors were bused to the Thompson Center to fight for more help keeping the hospital running.

The hospital is $7 million in debt and needs $600,000 to make payroll.

Hospital administrators say the state owes the hospital $6 million, but according to Gov. Pat Quinn, the state has given the hospital all the money it owes for the year.

A spokeswoman for the governor says state officials plan to meet with hospital leaders later in the week to talk about ways to keep Roseland open.3

Days from now Roseland Community Hospital will stop taking patients and will prepare to close its doors.  28,000 people went through its doors last year. The people running it say its time for the state to pitch in.

Protestors filled the sidewalk outside the hospital today. 560 jobs will be lost is the hospital shuts down and the neighborhood, mostly a poor, minority population on the far south side, will have to drive eight miles to the next closet hospital for care.  Many of the patients at the hospital represent the uninsured or the under-insured.

The hospital’s CEO is blaming the governor for not paying $7 million in debt it owes the hospital. The governor’s office says it owes Roseland, which is a private institution, no money and accused them of mismanagement. Gov Quinn does not think hospital administrators have laid out a sustainable plan for the facility. A taxpayer bailout is not an option, his spokesperson claims.

The governor’s office says it has met with officials at Roseland over the past 6 weeks yet no plan has been determined that could keep Roseland open.

Protesters are back at the South Side hospital this afternoon to sound off about the plan close it.

roselandhospitalprotesters

(PHOTO COURTESY: WGN REPORTER TONYA FRANCISCO)

Roseland Hospital could be shut down as early as Wednesday unless the state comes up with about $600,000 to make payroll.

Roseland officials say Governor Quinn’s office promised them the state would give them the money needed to keep the hospital open, but then told them Friday the funding wasn’t available.

Roseland is $7 million in debt.

The state owes the hospital $6 million, but Governor Quinn denies that.

Roseland Hospital in Chicago is caught in the middle of a tough economy.  Just this week, more than 60 pink slips were  handed out.  That’s about 13 percent of its staff.

The hospital  is now pleading with the state for an additional $7 million dollars in funding.  It is the only hospital within an 8 mile radius in an area that has seen its fair share of violence lately.  It’s not a trauma center but last year 35 shooting victims went to Roseland first, then trauma centers.

Roseland has had some management issues in the past which is what the state says it’s concerned about.  The hospital brought down its debt recently from $9 million to $4 million, but with more than 40 percent of its patients uninsured, they are simply taking baby steps in fixing the problem.

The governor’s office released a statement saying, “The Governor is concerned about Roseland’s financial viability. The hospital plays a vital role as an anchor for the community. That’s why upon learning of the hospital’s problems, he immediately directed senior staff to lead discussions with Roseland executives and community leaders several weeks ago to explore how the state, city and federal governments can partner to help Roseland adapt to today’s changing health care landscape.”

The governor’s office says it wants to make sure Roseland has a long term plan.  They are waiting for paperwork from the hospital outlining that plan but so far they say that has not happened.

In the meantime, the clock is ticking which could lead to more layoffs in the future.

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