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Illinois CeaseFire director charged with domestic battery

The director of the anti-violence program Illinois CeaseFire has been charged with domestic battery.

Police arrested Tio Hardiman, 50, on Friday after his wife filed a formal complaint.

His wife claimed Hardiman punched and kicked her, leaving her with a swollen lip, bruises and a cut on her neck.

 

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Weeks after former CeaseFire director Tio Hardiman was charged with domestic battery, his wife filed for divorce.

Alison Hardiman filed divorce papers in Cook County Court on Wednesday.

Tio Haridman is accused of punching and kicking his wife during an argument in their Hillside home. After the abuse allegation, he was let go from his job as the head of an anti-violence group.

Allison Hardiman was previously granted an order of protection against her husband of seven years.

Tio Hardiman’s next court appearance is July 2.

 

The outgoing director of the anti-violence group Ceasefire appeared in court Tuesday on domestic battery charges.

Tio Hardiman is accused of punching and kicking his wife during an argument in their Hillside home last week.

Attorneys for Tio Hardiman’s wife say he beat her “like an animal” and he did so while she was in a vulnerable state. She has suffered from a heart attack and two strokes, including one this past month.

Haridman says he loves his wife and he would never hurt her.  He also feel’s “shipwrecked” and “abandoned” by Ceasefire. The anti-violence group announced Monday it would not be renewing his contract.

On the day after he lost his job Hardiman appeared in court in Maywood on charges of domestic battery.

His wife, Allison, was granted an order of protection against her husband of seven years.

Hardiman cannot go near their Hillside home, except to collect his clothes. He will be staying at a building she owns in Maywood.

When asked the severity of his wife’s medical conditions, Hardiman says he has not seen her medical records.

Mrs. Hardiman was in court, wearing a green suit and black high heels. She did not speak to the media or to her husband.

Tio Hardiman says the abuse never happened and that his wife’s relatives are banding together to conspire against him. He says the truth will come out during future court dates.

“A lot of people are benefiting off my high-profile status,” said Tio Hardiman.  “I think that my wife’s lawyer is a sinister individual because he’s trying to pump hatred into my wife and knows that I love her.”

His next court appearance is July, 2.

The head of the anti-violence group CeaseFire Illinois is losing his job after charges he beat his wife.

Tio Hardiman tells the Chicago Tribune he feels betrayed by the organization and its founder.

TioHardimanThe University of Illinois Chicago, which operates CeaseFire, says Hardiman’s contract as director won’t be renewed at the end of the month.

Hardiman insists he’s innocent of the domestic battery complaint and says that he feels “shipwrecked and abandoned.”

He was arrested Friday after his wife said he punched and kicked her during an argument.

Police Supt. Garry McCarthy said the city would not have to end its contract with Ceasefire based on what happened with Hardiman.

“Being in the public eye, obviously, perhaps it gets more attention and it’s embarrassing, and I am certainly aware of that.” McCarthy said. “But as far as the program goes, you know the program is going to be evaluated on its success or failure, and how effective it is, not this issue with Tio Hardiman.”

The director of the anti-violence program CeaseFire was released from jail Saturday night after posting bond on a domestic battery charge

Police arrested Tio Hardiman, 50, on Friday after his wife filed a formal complaint.

His wife claimed Hardiman punched and kicked her, leaving her with a swollen lip, bruises and a cut on her neck.

She plans to seek an order of protection.

A bond court judge set bail at $20,000.

CeaseFire organization officials placed Hardiman on administrative leave, pending the outcome of his case.

Cook County records show Hardiman has a 1999 conviction for misdemeanor domestic battery.

Hardiman is expected for a court appearance in Maywood on Tuesday.

 

The director of the anti-violence program CeaseFire is due in bond court today, after being charged with domestic violence.

For years he’s been one of Chicago’s leading voices against gang violence.

Hardiman, 50, was taken into custody at about 9 a.m. Friday. His wife came to the police station in Hillside, Ill. at 8 a.m. with signs of injury, police say, and filed a formal complaint against him. Sources tell WGN he kicked his wife in the rear.

His organization, CeaseFire, receives state funding to send out violence interrupters to mediate gang conflicts in neighborhoods throughout the city. Hardiman is seen as the pioneer of the violence interrupter concept.  Last fall, CeaseFire received its first contract with the city — a $1 million grant as gun violence was skyrocketing.

Cook County records show Hardiman has a 1999 conviction for misdemeanor domestic battery.

For years he’s been one of Chicago’s leading voices against gang violence. In fact, he was here at WGN for an interview just yesterday.

But now Illinois CeaseFire director Tio Hardiman is himself accused of domestic violence.

Hardiman, 50, was taken into custody at about 9 a.m. Friday. His wife came to the police station in Hillside, Ill. at 8 a.m. with signs of injury, police say, and filed a formal complaint against him. Sources tell WGN he kicked his wife in the rear.

Hardiman’s organization, CeaseFire, receives state funding to send out violence interrupters to mediate gang conflicts in neighborhoods throughout the city.  Hardiman is seen as the pioneer of the violence interrupter concept.  Last fall, CeaseFire received its first contract with the city — a $1 million grant as gun violence was skyrocketing.

The relationship between the Chicago Police Department and CeaseFire has been an uneasy one, however, as the organization hires ex-cons to mediate gang disputes.  Hardiman’s organization was started in 2000 by the Chicago Project for Violence at University of Illinois at Chicago. The details from police of Friday morning’s events are undoubtedly eyebrow raising, in light of the energies Hardiman has spent fighting violence.

Hardiman is spending the night at the Hillside police lock-up.  He’ll be in bond court in Haywood at 8:30 a.m. Friday.

Hardiman’s colleagues at CeaseFire are commenting on the incident, and there’s no word on how this incident will impact Hardiman’s position in the organization.

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