Story Summary

Explosions at Boston Marathon leave 3 dead, hundreds wounded

At least two explosions rocked the finish line at the Boston Marathon.

More than 100 people were injured in the blasts and three people died.

Shortly after what’s being called a “twin bombing,” authorities released images of two suspects.

Suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, was killed in a shootout with police.

His brother Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 19, was later captured by police.

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A moment of silence at the finish line, the tolling of church bells and a solemn flag-raising ceremony capped the first anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombing Tuesday.

Under a steady rain on Boylston Street, where two homemade bombs last April 15 marked the deadliest terrorist attack in the United States since 9/11, scores gathered in the personification of a slogan that captured the country: “Boston Strong.”

After a stirring rendition of “God Bless America,” ordinary people, bombing survivors, first responders and dignitaries — including Vice President Joe Biden — bowed their heads in a moment of silence, saw the American flag raised, and sang the national anthem shortly before 3 p.m. on the spot where explosions, carnage, screams and smoke interrupted one of the city’s most joyous and popular events one year ago.

Earlier, thousands gathered to mark the anniversary of a horror that shook the nation.

“We would never wish the devastation and pain we have experienced on any of you,” said Patrick Downes, who was among the many injured in the twin bombings at last year’s Boston Marathon. “However, we do wish that all of you, at some point in your lives, feel as loved as we have felt this last year. It has been the most humbling experience of our lives. We hope you feel all the emotion we feel when we say ‘thank you.’”

Downes was a newlywed at the time of the attack. He and his wife, Jessica Kensky, each lost a leg.

Before the crowd gathered Tuesday at the Hynes Veterans Memorial Convention Center, he spoke of the three people killed in the blasts and a university police officer killed days later amid efforts to catch the suspects. He called them “guardian angels.”

“Let’s show them they live on in our bonds of family, friendship and community and in the infectious spirit we will feel on the third Monday in April for years to come.” That’s the date of the marathon.

After a string of speakers, Biden began his remarks by saying, “I’ve never witnessed a tribute like I heard today.” To the survivors, he said, “My God, you have survived and you have soared. You are truly inspiring. I’ve never heard anything so beautiful as what all of you just said.”

“So much has been taken from you, but you never, never have given up,” he said.

“You have become the face of America’s resolve for the whole world to see,” Biden said, adding that people all around the world know the pride, courage, and resolve of Bostonians. “That’s why the twisted, cowardly terrorists who acted here and in other places do what they do. They try to instill fear so that we will jettison what we value the most and what the world most values about us: an open society, our system of justice, our freedom of religion; our access to opportunity, the free flow of information and ideas.”

The terrorists, Biden said, “wanted to make America afraid so that maybe, maybe, we’d begin to change our ways. That’s the objective — the very soul of who we are. They figured if they instill enough fear, we will change. And it infuriates them that we refuse to bend, refuse to change, refuse to yield to fear.

“You are Boston strong. But America is strong … That’s what makes us so proud of this city and this state. What makes me so proud to be an American is that we have never, ever yielded to fear. Never.”

At the marathon, “the whole world witnessed ordinary citizens doing extraordinary things” to help each other, the vice president said.

“America will never, ever, ever stand down,” he said. “We are Boston. We are America. We respond, we endure, we overcome and we own the finish line.”

‘Boston strong’

“Next week, we will run again,” said Tom Grilk, executive director of the Boston Athletic Association. “But on this day, in this place, in remembrance and resolve, we gather as citizens of Boston, Boston strong.”

One year ago, “the very fabric of this community was tested to its core,” he said, but the city “inspired.”

“You are strong at this broken place,” former Mayor Tom Menino told the crowd, adding, “the heartbeat of Boston is a mighty force.”

To those who lost loved ones and to the many who were wounded, Menino said, “whatever you have to do to recover and carry on, know that the people of Boston and I will be right there by your side.” Menino was mayor at the time of the attack.

bostonstrongOn April 15, 2013, the Patriots’ Day bombings killed three people, including an 8-year-old boy, and wounded at least 264 others. The city then underwent days of fear as the two identified suspects, the Tsarnaev brothers, were on the run. Police say they killed a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer in the process, and then Tamerlan Tsarnaev was run over by his younger brother, Dzhokhar, as they battled police. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has pleaded not guilty to 30 counts and is scheduled to go on trial in November.

Obama: Boston will show it ‘chooses to run again’

“A year ago, tragedy struck at the 117th Boston Marathon,” President Obama said in a written statement Tuesday. “Four innocent people were killed that week, and hundreds more were wounded. Today, we remember Krystle Campbell, Lingzi Lu, Martin Richard, and Sean Collier. And we send our thoughts and prayers to those still struggling to recover…

“One year later, we also stand in awe of the men and women who continue to inspire us — learning to stand, walk, dance and run again. With each new step our country is moved by the resilience of a community and a city. And when the sun rises over Boylston Street next Monday — Patriot’s Day — hundreds of thousands will come together to show the world the meaning of Boston Strong as a city chooses to run again.”

David Yepez, a teen who was wounded in the attack, followed Downes at Tuesday’s ceremony. He hailed the first responders, doctors and others who helped in the wake of the bombings. “Thank you for your love, compassion and generosity,” Yepez said. “You have touched our hearts in a way that, many times, our gratitude could only be expressed through our tears of joy.”

Adrianne Haslet-Davis, a dancer who lost her left foot in the attack, told the crowd, “If anyone is wondering what they can do, what you can do, I would answer: Look around. People in your community need your support. They need your patience and they need your time … Let April 15 be a day when we all work together to make this world a better place.”

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick said, “We share the same fears, the same hopes, the same community,” he said. “We are, in the end, one community.”

He added that he hopes “as we remember the dead and encourage the injured, that we remember community…. The power of love itself — that’s what community is.”

A series of musical performances helped set a solemn but hopeful tone for the ceremony. The world-renowned Boston Pops orchestra performed, with singer Renese King singing both “America the Beautiful” and “For Good,” a song from the musical “Wicked.” The Boston Children’s Chorus performed “Up to the Mountain.”

A year after the bombings, families of the victims are struggling to come to terms with the loss.

“She had that special, I don’t know what it is, that special thing about her,” said Lillian Campbell, grandmother of bombing victim Krystle Campbell, 29. “And you felt happy around her because she was always laughing and bubbly. I loved her.”

Some victims injured in the attack are showing their perseverance by planning to take part in this year’s marathon, scheduled for Monday — even victims who suffered severe injuries.

“Last year, I was on the ground at the finish line. This year, I’ll be running across it,” said Kevin White. “It kind of proves to people that evil isn’t going to win.” White, then 34, had shrapnel through his legs a year ago. His 71-year-old father, Bill, lost a leg.

Authorities have announced extensive security plans for this year’s marathon, which is expected to bring in $176 million for the Boston area’s economy.

Brothers Paul and J.P. Norden each lost a leg in the attack last year. On Tuesday, they began a trek: walking the entire 26.2-mile marathon route, along with family and good friends. “I feel so blessed,” their mother, Liz, said in a Facebook post, adding that she couldn’t be prouder.

Police investigate bags near finish line

Hours after Tuesday’s anniversary event, police bomb squad investigators were checking out two backpacks near the marathon finish line and using a robot to make sure one of the bags was safe. The other bag had been cleared, Boston Police spokesman Mike McCarthy said, although it was not clear which of the two bags was still under scrutiny.

At about 6:50 p.m., two bags were found, he said. One bag was unattended, he said, while the other one was worn by an individual.

“They came across an individual. He’s the one we’re the most concerned about right now. He was walking down the street. He got very vocal. He was yelling something,” McCarthy said.

Police officers confronted him, escorted him from the area and cordoned off the area. The man was taken into custody for questioning, McCarthy said.

“It appears as though he has some problems,” McCarthy said. “He’s an emotionally disturbed person. They’re interviewing him now.”

An FBI spokeswoman said the agency was at the scene assisting police.

Earlier Tuesday, police responded to a report of a possible pipe bomb near Boston’s South Station. Investigators determined it wasn’t an explosive, but rather a high-voltage fuse that didn’t pose a threat, state officials said.

Authorities seemed to be bracing for the possibility of more bomb scares.

“To ease fears & concerns relating to backpacks,” Boston Police said in a Twitter post Tuesday night that they were “discouraging their use” at this years marathon.
TM & © 2014 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

Federal prosecutors will seek the death penalty against Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said Thursday afternoon.

Authorities allege Tsarnaev, a Chechnya-born American, and his brother Tamerlan planted two homemade bombs near the finish line of the April 15 Boston Marathon, killing three and injuring more than 250.

A Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer was killed three days later, triggering the massive manhunt that led to Tsarnaev’s capture. His brother was shot and killed by police during the manhunt.

“The nature of the conduct at issue and the resultant harm compel this decision,” Holder said in a statement released by the Justice Department.

After Holder made his decision, prosecutors filed Thursday a notice with a federal court that they would seek the death penalty in the case, according to Carmen Ortiz, the U.S. attorney for Massachusetts.

Dzhokar Tsarnaev is charged with 30 federal counts stemming from the attack. He has pleaded not guilty to all charges.

TM & © 2014 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

bostonsuspectphotos

By Ed Payne, CNN

Boston marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev suffered multiple and severe gunshot injuries before his capture in April, newly released court documents show.

The most serious of the injuries was a gunshot wound that appeared to enter through the left inside of his mouth and exit through the lower left side of his face, said Stephen Ray Odom, a trauma surgeon who treated Tsarnaev at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

“This was a high-powered injury that has resulted in skull-base fracture, with injuries to the middle ear, the skull base, … his … vertebrae … as well as injury to the pharynx, (and) the mouth.” Odom said in testimony given April 22, three days after Tsarnaev was arrested following the bombing.

His testimony, unsealed Monday, does not say whether the 20-year-old college student inflicted the wound on himself or suffered it during his showdown with police April 19.

Authorities cornered him in a boat in the backyard of Watertown, Massachusetts, home after an intense manhunt.

Miranda rights in hospital

Another document unsealed Monday said a special team of federal agents were able to speak with the seriously wounded Tsarnaev for about two days without any Miranda warnings being given, under a “public safety exception.” The document shows he was read his Miranda rights in the hospital on April 22.

Tsarnaev is charged with killing four people — three spectators who died in the April 15 bombings and a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer ambushed in his cruiser a few days later.

At least 264 people were wounded in the double bombings, which took place near the marathon finish line.

He is awaiting trial, after having pleaded not guilty to 30 federal charges. If convicted, he could receive up to life in prison or the death penalty.

His older brother, Tamerlan, is also accused of the attacks. He was killed when Tsarnaev ran over him as police were trying to handcuff him, authorities said.

CNN learned in the weeks following the bombing that Tsarnaev admitted to the acts, and said he and his brother acted alone. Sources say he has since stopped talking with the government.

CNN’s Lizzie Jury contributed to this report.

bostonsuspectphotos

Photo Courtesy: Boston Magazine.com

By Matt Smith, CNN

The backlash over Rolling Stone’s cover photo of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev led to the release of new photos of his capture Thursday, images a police photographer said show “the real Boston bomber.”

In contrast to the tousle-haired, placid-looking 19-year-old on the front of the magazine, the new pictures show Tsarnaev emerging from the boat where he was cornered — his face smeared with blood, his skin ashen in the laser glow from snipers’ gun sights.

In one, he pulls up his shirt, apparently showing he has no weapon underneath; in another, he slumps across the deck of the trailered boat, his bloodied arm hanging down.

The pictures were taken by Massachusetts State Police Sgt. Sean Murphy and published online by Boston Magazine on Thursday afternoon.

In a statement accompanying the photos, Murphy called the Rolling Stone cover “an insult” and “hurtful” to survivors of the April 15 bombings.

“This guy is evil,” Murphy said. “This is the real Boston bomber. Not someone fluffed and buffed for the cover of Rolling Stone magazine.”

John Wolfson, Boston Magazine’s editor in chief, said the magazine has hundreds of similar photos and will publish more in its September issue. He said Murphy was “conflicted on some level” about releasing the photos, but “genuinely worried” about how the Rolling Stone cover will affect the victims’ families.

“I think he was also worried that certain impressionable people might be lured to replicate that by the kind of glamorous-looking photo that is on the Rolling Stone cover,” Wolfson told CNN’s “The Situation Room.”

A Massachusetts State Police spokesman said that the agency had not authorized the photos’ release.

“Today’s dissemination to Boston Magazine of photographs of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev and police activity related to his capture was not authorized by the Massachusetts State Police,” spokesman David Procopio said in a statement issued Thursday night. “The department will not release the photographs to media outlets. The State Police will have no further comment on this matter tonight.”

Procopio told CNN late Thursday night that Murphy had been relieved of duty for one day and will have a status hearing to determine whether he will be on full duty, restricted duty or suspended during an internal police investigation.

The hearing will likely be next week, Procopio said.

Murphy could not be immediately reached for comment.

Tsarnaev is awaiting trial on federal charges in the Boston Marathon bombings, which killed three people and wounded more than 260 on April 15. In addition, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer was shot to death during the dramatic pursuit of Tsarnaev and his brother, Tamerlan, who was killed during a gun battle with police.

Tsarnaev has pleaded not guilty.

Rolling Stone has defended its decision to profile Tsarnaev, whom the same cover called a “monster.” The magazine said the story “falls within the traditions of journalism and Rolling Stone’s long-standing commitment to serious and thoughtful coverage of the most important political and cultural issues of our day.”

But the cover photo has sparked fury on social media and prompted several retail chains to pull the issue from their racks.

Still, some people seemed eager to sell it.

By Thursday, the eBay auction website listed dozens of copies of the controversial edition of Rolling Stone for sale.

CNN’s Dave Alsup and Laura Batchelor contributed to this report.

TM & © 2013 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

bostonsuspectrollingstoneBy Julie Cannold. Mayra Cuevas and Joe Sterling, CNN

Accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s face on the cover of the latest Rolling Stone sparked a backlash against the magazine Wednesday in social media and in boardrooms around the country.

“THE BOMBER,” the cover reads. “How a popular, promising student was failed by his family, fell into radical Islam and became a monster.”

The photo of a tousle-haired, thinly goateed Tsarnaev is one the suspect posted online himself and has been picked up by other outlets. But a groundswell of criticism objecting to its prominent play emerged on platforms such as Twitter and Facebook and among leaders in Boston, where the marathon bombings killed three people, wounded more than 200 and led to a frantic manhunt that left a police officer dead.

Ed Kelly, president of the Professional Fire Fighters of Massachusetts, called it “insulting.” Using Tsarnaev’s booking photo might have been one thing, but a photo that shows “the innocence of youth” gives the wrong message, Kelly told CNN.

“He gave up any innocence he had on April 15, when he took the life of an innocent child, two women and then went on to execute a police officer,” Kelly said.

“What he did to a city, a country, we’re never going to forgive him for it,” Kelly said. “We’re not going to cower from it. It disturbs us that our media chooses to celebrate it.”

Three prominent New England-based businesses — CVS pharmacies, Stop & Stop, and Tedeschi Food Shops — heard the public outcry and announced they will not sell that edition, which will be on newsstands soon.

“Music and terrorism don’t mix!” the Tedeschi firm said on its Facebook page, which carries the cover image with a circle and a line crossed through it. One Facebook commenter said, “I’m done with Rolling Stone.”

The Illinois-based drugstore chain Walgreens and Rite Aid, based in Pennsylvania, said they won’t won’t carry the issue, either.

And in a letter to Rolling Stone publisher Jann Wenner, Boston Mayor Thomas Menino urged the magazine to follow up with stories “on the brave and strong suvivors” of the attacks and the doctors, nurses, friends and volunteers who helped them.

“The survivors of the Boston attacks deserve Rolling Stone cover stories, though I no longer feel that Roling Stone deserves them,” Menino wrote.

Rolling Stone, critic defend cover

In a statement, the magazine said its thoughts were “always with” the bombing victims and their families.

“The cover story we are publishing this week falls within the traditions of journalism and Rolling Stone’s long-standing commitment to serious and thoughtful coverage of the most important political and cultural issues of our day,” it said. “The fact that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is young, and in the same age group as many of our readers, makes it all the more important for us to examine the complexities of this issue and gain a more complete understanding of how a tragedy like this happens.”

While primarily a music magazine, the journal also has forged a reputation for hard-hitting pieces on national affairs, politics and popular culture. For example, journalist Michael Hastings wrote a 2010 profile of Gen. Stanley McChrystal that led to the officer’s abrupt retirement. In his profile, Hastings quoted McChrystal and his staff criticizing and mocking key administration officials.

Washington Post media critic Erik Wemple said Rolling Stone should be out defending its article, because it’s “a pretty easy thing to defend.”

“What you have here is a story about a guy who was very integrated and well-balanced, by all accounts, member of our society until something happened,” Wemple said. “We don’t know precisely what happend and that was the whole point of this Rolling Stone story — to account for how he slid off the rails.”

He called the companies that are pulling it from the racks “cowardly,” noting that The New York Times used the same photo back in May. The photo doesn’t glamorize Tsarnaev, he argued, but “humanizes” him for people “who want to see him as an animal from Day One.”

“The facts are he wasn’t an animal, at least to his peer group, for the longest time. They remember him as a dear friend,” Wemple said. “That’s a problem, because he was part of our society and he turned on it by all indications, or allegedly.”

The article about the bombing suspect is a deeply researched account, the magazine said in a synopsis about the story, which it published online Wednesday afternoon. Among its revelations:

– A public plea from his former wrestling coach may ultimately have convinced Tsarnaev to surrender when police surrounded the boat in which he was hiding.

– In high school, Tsarnaev played down the fact that he was a Muslim. But he also took his religion seriously.

– He once confided to a friend that he thought the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks could be justified because of U.S. policies toward Muslim countries.

Slammed across social media

But Rhode Island-based CVS Caremark Corp. said its decision “is the right decision out of respect for the victims of the attack and their loved ones,” company spokesman Michael DeAngelis told CNN.

Tedeschi Food Shops, based in Rockland, Massachusetts, said it supports the need to provide news but not “actions that serve to glorify the evil actions of anyone. With that being said, we will not be carrying this issue of Rolling Stone.”

Stop & Shop, a chain of stores based in Quincy, Massachusetts, said it won’t carry the latest issue “due to the public response and our customers feedback,” spokeswoman Suzi Robinson said.

Richard “Dic” Donohue, a transit police officer injured in a shootout with the bombing suspects, also criticized the cover.

“The new cover of Rolling Stone has garnered much attention due to its sensationalized depiction of one of the alleged bombers. My family and I were personally affected by these individuals’ actions. I cannot and do not condone the cover of the magazine,” which is thoughtless at best, he said.

And the magazine’s Facebook post of the cover image had received more than 16,000 comments by Wednesday evening.

“Oh look, Rolling Stone magazine is glamourizing terrorism. Awesome,” Adrienne Graham commented on the magazine’s Facebook page. “I will NOT be buying this issue, or any future issues.”

Others expressed similar sentiments, and words such as “tasteless,” “sickening” and “disgusting” flew around social media.

“What a slap in the face to the great city of Boston and the Marathon Bombing victims,” commented Lindsey Williamson.

The cover also brought out comments from the “Free Jahar” movement. (Dzhokhar is also spelled Jahar or Djahar.)

“#BoycottRollingStone calling Djahar a monster and stirring the pot even more shame on you! Innocent until PROVEN guilty,” tweeted @Jahars_Tsarnaev.

Authorities accuse Tsarnaev and his brother Tamerlan of setting off a pair of bombs just seconds apart near the finish line of the packed Boston Marathon course on Boylston Street on April 15. Tamerlan was killed during the police pursuit three nights later; Dzhokhar was captured and charged with 30 federal counts stemming from the attack. He pleaded not guilty to the charges last week.

TM & © 2013 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

The cover of “Rolling Stone” magazine usually features rock stars and celebrities; which is why many people are calling the magazine’s August 3rd edition “tasteless.”

It shows a photo of the surviving Boston bombings suspect, Dzokhar Tsarnaev.

Tsarnaev pleaded not guilty to 30 counts related to the bombings which killed three people and injured more than 260.

The magazine’s cover story claims to give an account of how a “charming kid with a bright future became a monster.”

Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev pleaded not guilty Wednesday to 30 federal counts related to the April 15 attacks.

Tsarnaev appeared in a federal courtroom in Boston on Wednesday for an arraignment in the April 15 bombings, which killed three spectators and wounded about 260, and the slaying of a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer three days later. He faces a total of 30 counts in connection with bombings and a police chase that left his brother, Tamerlan, dead.

MIT police officers lined up outside the courthouse as the hearing neared its end Wednesday afternoon in a show of solidarity with their fallen comrade, Sean Collier. Inside, many of the surviving victims watched as Tsarnaev was brought into court; the 19-year-old’s hair appeared disheveled as he looked back at them before entering his plea.

When the public last saw Tsarnaev, he was climbing out of a motorboat dry-docked in the backyard of a Watertown, Massachusetts, home. He was covered in blood from bullet wounds sustained during a manhunt that brought greater Boston to a standstill.

Victims and their families tend to appear in person at trials at two key moments, said CNN legal analyst Paul Callan: at the arraignment, and at the verdict and sentencing.

“It’s not something they want to watch on television. They want to be there,” he said.

The death penalty

Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino is confident about getting a conviction, he told the Boston Herald on Tuesday. “We should lock him up and throw away the key.”

But that won’t be enough for many victims and their families. And prosecutors will likely go for the death penalty.

Seventeen of the charges offer that possibility.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s lawyers will struggle to prevent a death penalty case, Callan said.

They will argue that he was under the “mesmerizing influence” of Tamerlan, who died in a shootout with police after a wild chase through Greater Boston. But Callan believes one piece of evidence will make it easy for prosecutors to shoot down that argument.

While he lay bleeding in the motorboat covered with tarp, the younger Tsarnaev apparently scrawled his motive for his alleged deeds onto its sides.

“The U.S. Government is killing our innocent civilians,” it read. “I can’t stand to see such evil unpunished.”

“We Muslims are one body, you hurt one you hurt us all.”

“Now I don’t like killing innocent people it is forbidden in Islam but due to said (unintelligible) it is allowed.”

“Stop killing our innocent people and we will stop.”

“That would indicate that he was not under his brother’s influence, that he had an independent thought process and dedication to this movement on his own,” Callan said.

Prosecutors will use the writings to argue intent — that Tsarnaev knew what he was doing.

Indictment blow by blow

Tsarnaev is charged with killing three spectators in the bombings and a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer ambushed in his cruiser a few days later. He is also accused of “maiming, burning and wounding scores of others,” U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz has said.

But that is merely a handful of the charges.

Add to those use of a weapon of mass destruction resulting in death, deadly bombing of a public place, use of a firearm during a crime of violence causing death, carjacking, bodily harm. The list goes on.

The indictment details the planning that allegedly went into the attacks. Tamerlan Tsarnaev bought 48 mortars, it says.

It also says that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev downloaded a copy of Inspire magazine, which included instructions on building IEDs using pressure cookers and explosive powder from fireworks.

Pressure cooker bombs were used in the Boston Marathon attacks, exploding near the finish line.

Three days after the attacks, on April 18, the FBI released photographs of the brothers, identifying them as bombing suspects.

Hours later, they drove their Honda Civic to the MIT campus, where they shot and killed Collier and attempted to steal his service weapon, the indictment says. They were allegedly armed with five IEDs, a Ruger P95 semiautomatic handgun, ammunition, a machete and a hunting knife.

The indictment alleges that late that night, the brothers carjacked a Mercedes in Boston using guns.

Soon after, police discovered the Tsarnaevs at an intersection in nearby Watertown, where they tried to apprehend them, but the brothers fired at the police and used four IEDs against them, the 74-page indictment alleges.

Police tackled the elder brother and were trying to handcuff him when Dzhokhar Tsarnaev got back into the Mercedes and drove it at the officers, according to the indictment. He wound up running over his brother, “contributing to his death.”

The younger Tsarnaev escaped, abandoned the car nearby and hid in the boat, where he remained until the owner noticed him and called police.

Health improved

Tsarnaev will likely appear to be in much better shape than the last time he was seen in public.

In late May, he was allowed to have a phone conversation with his mother, Zubeidat Tsarnaev, who lives in the Russian republic of Dagestan. She recorded it and played it back to CNN affiliate ITN, based in Britain.

She asked if he was in pain.

“No, of course not. I’m already eating and have been for a long time,” Dzhokhar told her.

He assured her that he was getting much better.

 

TM & © 2013 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

 

By Ben Brumfield and Joe Sterling, CNN

When the public last saw accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, he was climbing out of a motorboat dry-docked in the backyard of a Watertown, Massachusetts, home.

He was covered in blood from bullet wounds sustained during a manhunt that brought greater Boston to a standstill. Tsarnaev was taken to hospital and he has been out of sight for the last 11 weeks.

Wednesday, the 19-year-old steps back into the public eye, when he enters a courtroom for his arraignment.

He will not only face 30 charges there, including the killing of four people, but also the families of those who died. One of them was a boy just 8 years old.

bostonsuspectmug2

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

Some 260 people wounded in the Boston Marathon bomb attacks on April 15 have also been invited to attend. And hundreds are expected to.

Those who cannot fit into the courtroom will be allowed to watch the hearing from the overflow room.

Victims and their families tend to appear in person at trials at two key moments, said CNN legal analyst Paul Callan: at the arraignment, and at the verdict and sentencing.

“It’s not something they want to watch on television. They want to be there,” he said.

The death penalty

Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino is confident about getting a conviction, he told the Boston Herald on Tuesday. “We should lock him up and throw away the key.”

But that won’t be enough for many victims and their families. And prosecutors will likely go for the death penalty.

Seventeen of the charges offer that possibility.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s lawyers will struggle to prevent a death penalty case, Callan said.

They will argue that he was under the “mesmerizing influence” of his older brother, Tamerlan, who died in a shootout with police after a wild chase through Greater Boston.

But Callan believes one piece of evidence will make it easy for prosecutors to shoot down that argument.

While he lay bleeding in the motorboat covered with tarp, the younger Tsarnaev apparently scrawled his motive for his alleged deeds onto its sides.

“The U.S. Government is killing our innocent civilians,” it read. “I can’t stand to see such evil unpunished.”

“We Muslims are one body, you hurt one you hurt us all.”

“Now I don’t like killing innocent people it is forbidden in Islam but due to said (unintelligible) it is allowed.”

“Stop killing our innocent people and we will stop.”

“That would indicate that he was not under his brother’s influence, that he had an independent thought process and dedication to this movement on his own,” Callan said.

Prosecutors will use the writings to argue intent — that Tsarnaev knew what he was doing.

Indictment blow by blow

Tsarnaev is charged with killing three spectators in the bombings and a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer ambushed in his cruiser a few days later. He is also accused of “maiming, burning and wounding scores of others,” U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz has said.

But that is merely a handful of the charges.

Add to those use of a weapon of mass destruction resulting in death, deadly bombing of a public place, use of a firearm during a crime of violence causing death, carjacking, bodily harm. The list goes on.

The indictment details the planning that allegedly went into the attacks. Tamerlan Tsarnaev bought 48 mortars, it says.

It also says that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev downloaded a copy of Inspire magazine, which included instructions on building IEDs using pressure cookers and explosive powder from fireworks.

Pressure cooker bombs were used in the Boston Marathon attacks, exploding near the finish line.

Three days after the attacks, on April 18, the FBI released photographs of the brothers, identifying them as bombing suspects.

Hours later, they drove their Honda Civic to the MIT campus, where they shot and killed officer Sean Collier and attempted to steal his service weapon, the indictment says. They were allegedly armed with five IEDs, a Ruger P95 semiautomatic handgun, ammunition, a machete and a hunting knife.

The indictment alleges that late that night, the brothers carjacked a Mercedes in Boston using guns.

Soon after, police discovered the Tsarnaevs at an intersection in nearby Watertown, where they tried to apprehend them, but the brothers fired at the police and used four IEDs against them, the 74-page indictment alleges.

Police tackled the elder brother and were trying to handcuff him when Dzhokhar Tsarnaev got back into the Mercedes and drove it at the officers, according to the indictment. He wound up running over his brother, “contributing to his death.”

The younger Tsarnaev escaped, abandoned the car nearby and hid in the boat, where he remained until the owner noticed him and called police.

Health improved

Tsarnaev will likely appear to be in much better shape than the last time he was seen in public.

In late May, he was allowed to have a phone conversation with his mother, Zubeidat Tsarnaev, who lives in the Russian republic of Dagestan. She recorded it and played it back to CNN affiliate ITN, based in Britain.

She asked if he was in pain.

“No, of course not. I’m already eating and have been for a long time,” Dzhokhar told her.

He assured her that he was getting much better.

TM & © 2013 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

A federal grand jury has returned a 30-count indictment against Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings, the U.S. attorney’s office said Thursday.

The double bombings near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on April 15 killed three people and injured at least 264.

Police took Tsarnaev into custody on April 19 after finding him hiding in a boat in the backyard of a Watertown, Massachusetts, home.

The other bombing suspect, his brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev, died after a gunfight with authorities hours before his brother’s arrest. After much secrecy and protest, Tamerlan was buried in a rural Virginia cemetery.

TM & © 2013 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

A woman from Indiana, who was wounded at the Boston Marathon, is heading home Tuesday.

Beth Roche has been in rehabilitation in Boston since the bombing happened in April.

She had just watched her daughter cross the finish line, when the first explosion went off.

BombingVictimBIGHer knee was injured so badly that she couldn’t run away.

She ultimately had reconstructive surgery to help her regain use of her left leg.

Roche still faces more rehab in Indiana.

She said the hardest thing to get used to will be slowing down for a while, and sitting in the back seat of the car as she continues to heal.

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