Story Summary

California Man Hunt for Christopher Dorner

The Los Angeles Police Department and other law enforcement units are searching for Christopher Dorner, a renegade former police officer they say has killed three people in a self-proclaimed war on his old department.

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Medical examiners have positively identified the body of the renegade former Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner, the man authorities say killed four people and wounded three others in a vendetta against his old comrades.

That announcement from the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department came two days after a shootout, standoff and fire at a cabin in the mountains east of Los Angeles. Dorner’s remains were identified through dental records during an autopsy, the department said.

The charred remains of a man believed to be Dorner were found in the burned cabin late Tuesday. The cause of death was not released with the identification.

Dorner was fired from the Los Angeles Police Department in 2009 for falsely accusing his training officer of kicking a subdued suspect. After unsuccessfully challenging his dismissal in court, police say, he launched a campaign of guerrilla warfare against the LAPD, targeting numerous officers involved in his case and their families.

Dorner was cornered and died Tuesday afternoon in the San Bernardino Mountains, about 100 miles east of the city he had once sworn to protect and serve.

The 33-year-old former Navy officer holed up in the cabin after a shootout with law enforcement that left a sheriff’s deputy dead and another wounded, San Bernardino Sheriff John McMahon said.

The cabin caught fire when police shot tear gas canisters into it, McMahon told reporters Wednesday.

Although the canisters included pyrotechnic tear gas, which generates heat, “We did not intentionally burn down that cabin to get Mr. Dorner out,” he said.

The city of Los Angeles and other communities in southern California had issued a $1 million reward for information leading to Dorner’s capture and conviction. What to do with that reward was under discussion Thursday, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said.

“More than 20 jurisdictions and entities are involved in this reward, so all of them will be coming together to collectively determine whether any individual or individuals qualify for it,’” they said in a joint statement. “Our personal hope is that the reward will be distributed, but we must follow the rules and respect the procedures of each entity.”

Dorner’s mother, Nancy Dorner, expressed condolences for the victims in a statement given to Robin Sax at Fox 11 Los Angeles.

“It is with great sadness and heavy hearts that we express our deepest sympathies and condolences to anyone that suffered losses or injuries resulting from Christopher’s actions. We do not condone Christopher’s actions.

The family has no further comments and ask that our privacy be respected during this difficult time.”

Dorner was first named a suspect in two shooting deaths on February 3: Monica Quan, the daughter of his police union representative, and her fiance, Keith Lawrence.

Police say he then killed Michael Crain, a police officer in suburban Riverside, and wounded Crain’s partner in an ambush on their patrol car February 7. The partner, Officer Andrew Tachias, was in stable condition at a local hospital, Riverside police said.

They say Dorner also wounded an LAPD officer who chased him into nearby Corona.

In addition, LAPD officers guarding one of Dorner’s targets in suburban Torrance opened fire on a pickup truck that resembled Dorner’s, wounding two women inside. Beck called the shooting “tragic” and “horrific.”

In a manifesto announcing his planned rampage, Dorner said nothing had changed in the LAPD since its scandals of the 1990s, the Rodney King beating and the Rampart police corruption case. Those allegations have struck a chord with some who say that, despite the four killings, Dorner was seeking justice.

Shadowed by that history, Beck announced Saturday that the department would re-examine its proceedings against Dorner. The review is “not to appease a murderer,” but “to reassure the public that their police department is transparent and fair in all things we do,” he said.
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Near Big Bear Lake, California — It may take days before authorities can officially determine whether Christopher Jordan Dorner’s body was found in the ashes of a torched cabin near Big Bear Lake, California.

But several signs early Wednesday seemed to suggest that the ex-Los Angeles police officer’s vendetta against his brothers in blue ended in that wooden cabin with a shootout that left one deputy dead and another wounded.

The frenzied manhunt, road blocks and helicopter flights, which had brought the mountain town to a standstill for six days, died down Tuesday night.

And late in the evening, authorities announced that they found human remains in the cabin and would need forensic experts to identify them.

But even as the question of Dorner’s fate seemed close to being answered, other details eluded explanation.

The carjacking

The deputy’s death in the shootout Tuesday brought to four the number of people Dorner is accused of killing.

Dorner, a man who vowed to kill police officers to avenge what he called an unfair termination, was first named a suspect in two shooting deaths on February 3: that of the daughter of his police union representative and of her fiance.

Police also say he killed one officer in Riverside, California, and wounded two others Thursday.

Authorities offered a $1 million dollar reward in the case after Dorner’s burned truck was found on a forestry road near Big Bear Lake on February 7, about 100 miles east of Los Angeles.

Officers converged on the remote area but the trail went cold for days. On Sunday, the San Bernadino authorities said they had scaled back the search.

Timeline in manhunt

That all changed Tuesday, where arguably the most wanted man in America was finally spotted.

The question of where Dorner was between February 7 and Tuesday was unclear.

Wardens of the California Fish and Wildlife said they spotted Dorner driving a purple Nissan down the icy roads Tuesday. Dorner was driving very close to some school buses as if using them as cover, said Lt. Patrick Foy.

The wardens, driving in two different vehicles, chased Dorner and a gun battle ensued.

A warden’s car was hit.

Dorner crashed his car, ran and then quickly carjacked a pick up truck.

Rick Heltebrake, a camp ranger, said he was driving in the area when he saw the crashed purple car — and then something terrifying.

“Here comes this guy with a big gun and I knew who it was right away,” Heltebrake told CNN affiliate KTLA. “He just came out of the snow at me with his gun at my head. He said, ‘I don’t want to hurt you. Just get out of the car and start walking.’”

Heltebrake said he was allowed to get his dog out of the truck before he walked away with his hands up.

“Not more than 10 seconds later, I heard a loud round of gunfire,” Heltebrake said. “Ten to 20 rounds maybe. I found out later what that was all about.”

The fire

Dorner fled to a nearby cabin and got into another shootout with San Bernadino County deputies, killing one and wounding another.

San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon told reporters Tuesday the other deputy was in surgery “but he should be fine,”

The cabin caught fire after police tossed smoke devices inside, a law enforcement source told CNN.

The intense fire burned for hours as authorities waited at a distance.

Despite the enormity of the blaze, authorities were hesitant to officially say they had stopped Dorner.

“No body has been pulled out,” LAPD Cmdr. Andrew Smith said at a news conference Tuesday night. “No reports of a body being ID’d are true.”

Cindy Bachman, a spokeswoman for the lead agency in the case — the San Bernardino Sheriff’s Department — echoed the words, saying at a separate news conference that authorities believe whoever was in the cabin never left.

“They believe that there is a body in there, but it is not safe to go inside,” she told reporters.

Finally, late Tuesday night, sheriff’s investigators said they found charred human remains within the ashes of the torched cabin.

The department said it will work to identify the remains — but it could take a while.

The security

Clues to the targets of the violence were mentioned in Dorner’s fiery manifesto that was posted online. Authorities say Dorner began making good on his threats on February 3 when he allegedly killed Monica Quan and Keith Lawrence in an Irvine parking lot, south of Los Angeles.

According to the manifesto, Randal Quan, Monica Quan’s father, bungled Dorner’s LAPD termination appeal.

Randal Quan represented Dorner during the disciplinary hearing that resulted in his firing. The officer was among dozens named in the manifesto.

On February 7, Dorner allegedly opened fire on two LAPD police officers, wounding one, in the suburban city of Corona.

Roughly 20 minutes later, Dorner allegedly fired on two officers in the nearby city of Riverside, killing Officer Michael Crain and wounding another.

Since then, the LAPD has provided security and surveillance details for more than 50 police officers and their families — many of whom were named in the manifesto.

Police said Tuesday night they would continue to protect the people Dorner said he would target until it was confirmed that he died in the cabin.

In the manifesto Dorner wrote about death multiple times. Not just the death of his targets but of his own.

“Self Preservation is no longer important to me,” the manifesto said at one point. “I do not fear death as I died long ago.”

CNN’s Miguel Marquez reported from near Big Bear Lake and Lateef Mungin wrote from Atlanta. CNN’s Paul Vercammen, Stan Wilson, Casey Wian, Kathleen Johnston, Alan Duke, Matt Smith, Chelsea J. Carter, Michael Martinez and Holly Yan also contributed to this report.

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Two sheriff’s deputies were wounded in a shootout with a suspect believed to be renegade ex-Los Angeles police officer Christopher Jordan Dorner, authorities said.

Dorner had stolen a vehicle from a house in the Big Bear area when he came upon a police roadblock, the source said. Dorner opened fire on the deputies and later was surrounded by authorities, the source said. The deputies were airlifted to a hospital in Loma Linda with “unknown injuries,” according to a statement from the San Bernadino County Sheriff’s Department.

He was barricaded inside a cabin as officers moved in, the statement said.

The sheriff issued a statement asking news helicopters to pull back from the area because “gunfire is being exchanged.”

Former FBI assistant director Tom Fuentes said on CNN that authorities haven’t determined if the suspect has hostages, but will act as if he does.

Los Angeles police spokesman Adam Smith gave few details at an afternoon news conference, saying they believe the suspect had access to television and might be watching coverage.

“If he’s watching this, the message for himself is enough is enough,” Smith told reporters. “It’s time to turn yourself in, it’s time to stop the bloodshed.”

Authorities have been searching for Dorner since last week, after he was named as the suspect in the shooting deaths of the daughter of his police union representative and her fiance. Police also say he killed one police officer in Riverside and wounded two others on February 7.

The violent spree, authorities say, was part of Dorner’s campaign of vigilante justice for what he believes was his unfair termination.

Los Angeles police spokesman Lt. Andy Neiman said Tuesday that the department had received more than 1,000 tips on Dorner’s whereabouts. Some of the calls have come from Dorner’s acquaintances or people who think they have spotted the fugitive.

The pace of tips being given to investigators increased by 400% after the city of Los Angeles put up a $1 million reward on Sunday for information leading to Dorner’s arrest and conviction, Neiman said.

The search for the 270-pound, 6-foot Dorner has focused on the Big Bear Lake area, where authorities say his burning truck was discovered last week.

Over the past two weeks, the search, considered one of the largest in the history of Southern California, has taken authorities from Orange County to the border of Mexico and from Los Angeles to Big Bear Lake.

“Big Bear’s still where we’re looking right now,” Neiman said Tuesday. The search area surrounds where Dorner’s burning truck was discovered last Thursday .

“Until we can confirm that he’s either there or he’s not there, this investigation has to stick with what we know and what we know is that we found evidence that he was there,” Neiman said.

While the LAPD spokesman told reporters he was “not ready to confirm” that a man seen in security camera video from a Southern California sporting goods store was Dorner, the Los Angeles Times quoted unnamed law enforcement sources saying it was him.

The video, published Monday by the celebrity news website TMZ.com, shows the man carrying what appears to be scuba equipment at the Sports Chalet store in Torrance, California, on February 1, two days before the killings of Monica Quan, the daughter of the police union rep, and her fiancé, Keith Lawrence.

A “no bail” arrest warrant was issued for Dorner after the Riverside County district attorney filed a murder charge Monday against him in the killing of Riverside Police Officer Michael Crain.

“That allows him to be apprehended anywhere within California, out of state or out of the country,” District Attorney Paul Zellerbach told reporters Monday.

The murder charge is accompanied by two “special circumstances,” including killing a police officer on duty and firing a weapon from a vehicle.

Dorner was also charged with the attempted murder of three other police officers, including another Riverside officer who was wounded when Crain was killed. That officer, whose name has not been released, is in a lot of pain and faces “many surgeries,” Riverside Police Chief Sergio Diaz said.

Dorner is also accused of opening fire on two LAPD police officers, wounding one, in the suburb of Corona.

There has been speculation, based in part on an arrest warrant affidavit filed last week, that Dorner could have crossed state lines into Nevada or made his way to Mexico.

LAPD reopens case that led to Dorner’s dismissal

Over the weekend, LAPD said it was reopening the case that resulted in his termination.

Dorner accused his training officer of kicking a mentally ill man during an arrest in 2007. The LAPD ruled the complaint unfounded and kicked Dorner off the force for filing a false complaint.

Dorner challenged his firing in court and lost.

In a manifesto released last week, Dorner blamed racism and corruption in the LAPD for his termination and vowed to wage “unconventional and asymmetrical warfare” against LAPD officers and their families. He called it a “last resort” to clear his name and strike back at a department he says mistreated him.

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck had a different term for it Sunday.

“This is an act — and make no mistake about it — of domestic terrorism,” he told reporters Sunday. “This is a man who has targeted those that we entrust to protect the public. His actions cannot go unanswered.”

Targeting police

Authorities say Dorner began making good on his threats on February 3 when he allegedly killed Quan, 27, and Lawrence in an Irvine parking lot, south of Los Angeles.

According to the manifesto, Randal Quan, Monica Quan’s father, bungled Dorner’s LAPD termination appeal.

Randal Quan represented Dorner during the disciplinary hearing that resulted in his firing. The officer was among dozens named in the manifesto.

The retired officer told investigators he received a call from someone identifying himself as Dorner who told him he “should have done a better job of protecting his daughter,” according to a federal arrest warrant affidavit.

Investigators traced the call to Vancouver, Washington, but based on the timing of other sightings, they don’t believe Dorner was in Vancouver at the time, the affidavit states.

Days later, early Thursday morning, Dorner allegedly opened fire on two LAPD police officers, wounding one, in the suburban city of Corona.

Roughly 20 minutes later, Dorner allegedly fired on two officers in the nearby city of Riverside, killing Crain and wounding another.

Since then, the LAPD has provided security and surveillance details for more than 50 police officers and their families — many of whom were named in the manifesto.

Additionally, the LAPD is no longer releasing the police chief’s schedule to the public or the media.

‘Ghosts’ of the LAPD’s past

It was Dorner’s allegations of racism at the LAPD that led Beck over the weekend to reopen the investigation into his claims.

Beck said he was not doing it to “appease a murderer” but out of concern that Dorner’s allegations will resurrect a painful part of the department’s history.

For years, the LAPD was dogged by complaints of racism and corruption. In 1965 and 1992, the city was rocked by racial riots that were sparked, in part, by claims of police racism and brutality.

“I hear the same things you hear: The ghosts of the past of the Los Angeles Police Department,” Beck said Sunday. “I hear that people think maybe there is something to what he says, and I want to put that to rest.”

Despite numerous reviews of Dorner’s case, he said it has “never been reviewed by me.”

“If there is anything new, we will deal with it, and we will deal with it in a public way,” Beck said.
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UPDATE:

The San Bernardino Sheriff’s Department is echoing the LAPD’s refutation of reports that Dorner’s body was found in the burned cabin, but it acknowledges investigators believe a body is there.

“We believe (the suspect) is still inside the cabin that caught fire,” an SBSD spokeswoman said.

Later, she said, “(Investigators) believe a body is in there,” but that investigators still haven’t been inside the cabin to look for one.

“It is too hot. (It’s) still smoldering” and not safe to enter, she said.

“We believe that the person that barricaded himself inside the cabin and engaged in gunfire with our deputies … is still inside there even though the building burned,” she said.

FROM EARLIER

A body believed to be that of renegade ex-Los Angeles police officer Christopher Jordan Dorner was found Tuesday in a burning cabin near Big Bear Lake, California, multiple law enforcement sources told CNN.

The sources told CNN contributor and former FBI assistant director Tom Fuentes that law enforcement removed the body and are conducting a forensic exam to positively identify the man.

The law enforcement sources said they were told by officials at the Los Angeles Police Department that it is Dorner’s body.

The fire began after a SWAT team stormed a cabin near Big Bear Lake where a suspect — who authorities said matched Dorner’s description — had holed up after a fatal shootout with San Bernadino County sheriff’s deputies, a source familiar with the operation told CNN.

The cabin caught fire after police detonated smoke devices inside the cabin, the source said.

Aerial images showed heavy smoke and flames coming from a structure. The cabin continued to burn for hours after the fire started.

One of the two sheriff’s deputies wounded earlier Tuesday in the shootout earlier with the suspect died, San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon told reporters at California’s Loma Linda University Medical Center. The other deputy was in surgery “but he should be fine,” McMahon said.

The wounded officers were taken to the Loma Linda facility after shots were exchanged with a man at a police roadblock near Big Bear Lake, the sheriff’s office said earlier in a statement.

The day’s confrontations began when a California Fish and Wildlife officer was driving down a highway near Big Bear and he recognized a man fitting the description of Dorner — target of a massive manhunt since last week — driving a vehicle in the other direction. The wildlife officer chased the vehicle and the driver opened fire on the officer before abandoning the truck, a statement from the agency said.

The officer’s vehicle was hit numerous times, the statement said. While not specifically referring to the officer involved in the shootout, the statement said the agency’s officers “are all safe and accounted for.”

Cindy Bachman, a spokeswoman for the San Bernardino Sheriff’s Department, said the suspect fled into the woods then into the cabin where he fired at the approaching deputies and holed up though the afternoon, still exchanging gunfire with authorities.

Later as the fire burned, with authorities staying back, she said authorities weren’t 100% sure the suspect was still in the cabin.

Authorities have been searching for Dorner since he was named as the suspect in the shooting deaths February 3 of the daughter of his police union representative and her fiance. Police also say he killed one officer in Riverside, California, and wounded two others last Thursday.

The violent spree, authorities say, was part of Dorner’s campaign of vigilante justice for what he believes was his unfair termination.

Los Angeles police spokesman Lt. Andy Neiman said Tuesday that the department had received more than 1,000 tips on Dorner’s whereabouts. Some of the calls have come from Dorner’s acquaintances or people who think they have spotted the fugitive.

The pace of tips being given to investigators increased by 400% after the city of Los Angeles put up a $1 million reward on Sunday for information leading to Dorner’s arrest and conviction, Neiman said.

The search for the 270-pound, 6-foot Dorner has focused on the Big Bear Lake area, where authorities say his burning truck was discovered last week.

Over the past two weeks, the search, considered one of the largest in the history of Southern California, has taken authorities from Orange County to the border of Mexico and from Los Angeles to Big Bear Lake.

“Big Bear’s still where we’re looking right now,” Neiman said Tuesday. The search area surrounds where Dorner’s burning truck was discovered last Thursday .

“Until we can confirm that he’s either there or he’s not there, this investigation has to stick with what we know and what we know is that we found evidence that he was there,” Neiman said.

While the LAPD spokesman told reporters he was “not ready to confirm” that a man seen in security camera video from a Southern California sporting goods store was Dorner, the Los Angeles Times quoted unnamed law enforcement sources saying it was him.

The video, published Monday by the celebrity news website TMZ.com, shows the man carrying what appears to be scuba equipment at the Sports Chalet store in Torrance, California, on February 1, two days before the killings of Monica Quan, the daughter of the police union rep, and her fiancé, Keith Lawrence.

A “no bail” arrest warrant was issued for Dorner after the Riverside County district attorney filed a murder charge Monday against him in the killing of Riverside Police Officer Michael Crain.

“That allows him to be apprehended anywhere within California, out of state or out of the country,” District Attorney Paul Zellerbach told reporters Monday.

The murder charge is accompanied by two “special circumstances,” including killing a police officer on duty and firing a weapon from a vehicle.

Dorner was also charged with the attempted murder of three other police officers, including another Riverside officer who was wounded when Crain was killed. That officer, whose name has not been released, is in a lot of pain and faces “many surgeries,” Riverside Police Chief Sergio Diaz said.

Dorner is also accused of opening fire on two LAPD police officers, wounding one, in the suburb of Corona.

There has been speculation, based in part on an arrest warrant affidavit filed last week, that Dorner could have crossed state lines into Nevada or made his way to Mexico.

LAPD reopens case that led to Dorner’s dismissal

Over the weekend, LAPD said it was reopening the case that resulted in his termination.

Dorner accused his training officer of kicking a mentally ill man during an arrest in 2007. The LAPD ruled the complaint unfounded and kicked Dorner off the force for filing a false complaint.

Dorner challenged his firing in court and lost.

In a manifesto released last week, Dorner blamed racism and corruption in the LAPD for his termination and vowed to wage “unconventional and asymmetrical warfare” against LAPD officers and their families. He called it a “last resort” to clear his name and strike back at a department he says mistreated him.

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck had a different term for it Sunday.

“This is an act — and make no mistake about it — of domestic terrorism,” he told reporters Sunday. “This is a man who has targeted those that we entrust to protect the public. His actions cannot go unanswered.”

Targeting police

Authorities say Dorner began making good on his threats on February 3 when he allegedly killed Quan, 27, and Lawrence in an Irvine parking lot, south of Los Angeles.

According to the manifesto, Randal Quan, Monica Quan’s father, bungled Dorner’s LAPD termination appeal.

Randal Quan represented Dorner during the disciplinary hearing that resulted in his firing. The officer was among dozens named in the manifesto.

The retired officer told investigators he received a call from someone identifying himself as Dorner who told him he “should have done a better job of protecting his daughter,” according to a federal arrest warrant affidavit.

Investigators traced the call to Vancouver, Washington, but based on the timing of other sightings, they don’t believe Dorner was in Vancouver at the time, the affidavit states.

Days later, early Thursday morning, Dorner allegedly opened fire on two LAPD police officers, wounding one, in the suburban city of Corona.

Roughly 20 minutes later, Dorner allegedly fired on two officers in the nearby city of Riverside, killing Crain and wounding another.

Since then, the LAPD has provided security and surveillance details for more than 50 police officers and their families — many of whom were named in the manifesto.

Additionally, the LAPD is no longer releasing the police chief’s schedule to the public or the media.

‘Ghosts’ of the LAPD’s past

It was Dorner’s allegations of racism at the LAPD that led Beck over the weekend to reopen the investigation into his claims.

Beck said he was not doing it to “appease a murderer” but out of concern that Dorner’s allegations will resurrect a painful part of the department’s history.

For years, the LAPD was dogged by complaints of racism and corruption. In 1965 and 1992, the city was rocked by racial riots that were sparked, in part, by claims of police racism and brutality.

“I hear the same things you hear: The ghosts of the past of the Los Angeles Police Department,” Beck said Sunday. “I hear that people think maybe there is something to what he says, and I want to put that to rest.”

Despite numerous reviews of Dorner’s case, he said it has “never been reviewed by me.”

“If there is anything new, we will deal with it, and we will deal with it in a public way,” Beck said.
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A SWAT team has stormed a cabin near Big Bear Lake where a suspect believed to be renegade ex-Los Angeles police officer Christopher Jordan Dorner had holed up after a fatal shootout with sheriff’s deputies, a source familiar with the operation told CNN.

The cabin caught fire after police detonated smoke devices inside the cabin, the source said.

Aerial images showed heavy smoke and flames coming from a structure.

One of the two sheriff’s deputies wounded in the shootout with the suspect died earlier Tuesday, San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon told reporters at California’s Loma Linda University Medical Center. The other deputy was in surgery “but he should be fine,” McMahon said.

The wounded officers had been taken to the Loma Linda facility with “unknown injuries,” after a shootout with a man at a police roadblock near Big Bear, the San Bernardino Sheriff’s office said earlier in a statement.

A law enforcement source told CNN that Dorner had stolen a vehicle from a house and opened fire on the deputies before fleeing. Dorner later was surrounded by authorities, the source said.

Dorner barricaded himself inside a cabin, the sheriff’s statement said.

At one point during the afternoon, the sheriff issued a statement asking news helicopters to pull back from the area because “gunfire is being exchanged.”

Los Angeles police spokesman Adam Smith gave few details at an afternoon news conference about what was happening at Big Bear Lake, saying authorities believed the suspect had access to television and might be watching coverage.

“If he’s watching this, the message for himself is enough is enough,” Smith told reporters. “It’s time to turn yourself in, it’s time to stop the bloodshed.”

Authorities have been searching for Dorner since last week, after he was named as the suspect in the shooting deaths of the daughter of his police union representative and her fiance. Police also say he killed one police officer in Riverside and wounded two others on February 7.

The violent spree, authorities say, was part of Dorner’s campaign of vigilante justice for what he believes was his unfair termination.

Los Angeles police spokesman Lt. Andy Neiman said Tuesday that the department had received more than 1,000 tips on Dorner’s whereabouts. Some of the calls have come from Dorner’s acquaintances or people who think they have spotted the fugitive.

The pace of tips being given to investigators increased by 400% after the city of Los Angeles put up a $1 million reward on Sunday for information leading to Dorner’s arrest and conviction, Neiman said.

The search for the 270-pound, 6-foot Dorner has focused on the Big Bear Lake area, where authorities say his burning truck was discovered last week.

Over the past two weeks, the search, considered one of the largest in the history of Southern California, has taken authorities from Orange County to the border of Mexico and from Los Angeles to Big Bear Lake.

“Big Bear’s still where we’re looking right now,” Neiman said Tuesday. The search area surrounds where Dorner’s burning truck was discovered last Thursday .

“Until we can confirm that he’s either there or he’s not there, this investigation has to stick with what we know and what we know is that we found evidence that he was there,” Neiman said.

While the LAPD spokesman told reporters he was “not ready to confirm” that a man seen in security camera video from a Southern California sporting goods store was Dorner, the Los Angeles Times quoted unnamed law enforcement sources saying it was him.

The video, published Monday by the celebrity news website TMZ.com, shows the man carrying what appears to be scuba equipment at the Sports Chalet store in Torrance, California, on February 1, two days before the killings of Monica Quan, the daughter of the police union rep, and her fiancé, Keith Lawrence.

A “no bail” arrest warrant was issued for Dorner after the Riverside County district attorney filed a murder charge Monday against him in the killing of Riverside Police Officer Michael Crain.

“That allows him to be apprehended anywhere within California, out of state or out of the country,” District Attorney Paul Zellerbach told reporters Monday.

The murder charge is accompanied by two “special circumstances,” including killing a police officer on duty and firing a weapon from a vehicle.

Dorner was also charged with the attempted murder of three other police officers, including another Riverside officer who was wounded when Crain was killed. That officer, whose name has not been released, is in a lot of pain and faces “many surgeries,” Riverside Police Chief Sergio Diaz said.

Dorner is also accused of opening fire on two LAPD police officers, wounding one, in the suburb of Corona.

There has been speculation, based in part on an arrest warrant affidavit filed last week, that Dorner could have crossed state lines into Nevada or made his way to Mexico.

LAPD reopens case that led to Dorner’s dismissal

Over the weekend, LAPD said it was reopening the case that resulted in his termination.

Dorner accused his training officer of kicking a mentally ill man during an arrest in 2007. The LAPD ruled the complaint unfounded and kicked Dorner off the force for filing a false complaint.

Dorner challenged his firing in court and lost.

In a manifesto released last week, Dorner blamed racism and corruption in the LAPD for his termination and vowed to wage “unconventional and asymmetrical warfare” against LAPD officers and their families. He called it a “last resort” to clear his name and strike back at a department he says mistreated him.

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck had a different term for it Sunday.

“This is an act — and make no mistake about it — of domestic terrorism,” he told reporters Sunday. “This is a man who has targeted those that we entrust to protect the public. His actions cannot go unanswered.”

Targeting police

Authorities say Dorner began making good on his threats on February 3 when he allegedly killed Quan, 27, and Lawrence in an Irvine parking lot, south of Los Angeles.

According to the manifesto, Randal Quan, Monica Quan’s father, bungled Dorner’s LAPD termination appeal.

Randal Quan represented Dorner during the disciplinary hearing that resulted in his firing. The officer was among dozens named in the manifesto.

The retired officer told investigators he received a call from someone identifying himself as Dorner who told him he “should have done a better job of protecting his daughter,” according to a federal arrest warrant affidavit.

Investigators traced the call to Vancouver, Washington, but based on the timing of other sightings, they don’t believe Dorner was in Vancouver at the time, the affidavit states.

Days later, early Thursday morning, Dorner allegedly opened fire on two LAPD police officers, wounding one, in the suburban city of Corona.

Roughly 20 minutes later, Dorner allegedly fired on two officers in the nearby city of Riverside, killing Crain and wounding another.

Since then, the LAPD has provided security and surveillance details for more than 50 police officers and their families — many of whom were named in the manifesto.

Additionally, the LAPD is no longer releasing the police chief’s schedule to the public or the media.

‘Ghosts’ of the LAPD’s past

It was Dorner’s allegations of racism at the LAPD that led Beck over the weekend to reopen the investigation into his claims.

Beck said he was not doing it to “appease a murderer” but out of concern that Dorner’s allegations will resurrect a painful part of the department’s history.

For years, the LAPD was dogged by complaints of racism and corruption. In 1965 and 1992, the city was rocked by racial riots that were sparked, in part, by claims of police racism and brutality.

“I hear the same things you hear: The ghosts of the past of the Los Angeles Police Department,” Beck said Sunday. “I hear that people think maybe there is something to what he says, and I want to put that to rest.”

Despite numerous reviews of Dorner’s case, he said it has “never been reviewed by me.”

“If there is anything new, we will deal with it, and we will deal with it in a public way,” Beck said.
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The massive search for a renegade ex-cop bent on carrying out “unconventional and asymmetrical warfare” focused on a mountainous resort area near Los Angeles for a sixth day Tuesday, but to no avail, authorities said.

Christopher Jordan Dorner is accused of killing one police officer and wounding two others, as well as killing the daughter of his police union representative and her fiancé.

The violent spree, authorities say, is part of Dorner’s campaign of vigilante justice for what he believes was his unfair termination.

Los Angeles police spokesman Lt. Andy Neiman said Tuesday that the department had received more than 1,000 tips on Dorner’s whereabouts. Some of the calls have come from Dorner’s past acquaintances or people who think they have spotted the fugitive.

“It’s frustrating,” Neiman said. “But we are hoping that something will break loose from the public.”

ChristopherDornerThe pace of tips being given to investigators increased by 400% since the city of Los Angeles put up $1 million in reward money Sunday for information leading to Dorner’s arrest and conviction, Neiman said.

The search for the 270-pound, 6-foot Dorner has focused on the Big Bear Lake area, where authorities say his burning truck was discovered last week after he allegedly started carrying out his threats to kill police and their family members.

Over the past two weeks, the search — considered one of the largest in the history of Southern California — has taken authorities from Orange County to the border of Mexico and from Los Angeles to Big Bear Lake.

“Big Bear’s still where we’re looking right now,” Neiman said Tuesday. The search area surrounds where Dorner’s burning truck was discovered last Thursday .

“Until we can confirm that he’s either there or he’s not there, this investigation has to stick with what we know and what we know is that we found evidence that he was there,” Neiman said.

While the LAPD spokesman told reporters he was “not ready to confirm” that a man seen in security camera video from a southern California sporting goods store was Dorner, the Los Angeles Times quoted unnamed law enforcement sources saying it was him.

The video, published Monday by the celebrity news website TMZ.com, shows the man carrying what appears to be scuba equipment at the Sports Chalet store in Torrance, California, on February 1, two days before the killings of Monica Quan, the daughter of the police union rep, and her fiancé, Keith Lawrence.

A “no bail” arrest warrant was issued for Dorner after the Riverside County district attorney filed a murder charge Monday against him in the killing of Riverside Police Officer Michael Crain.

“That allows him to be apprehended anywhere within California, out of state or out of the country,” District Attorney Paul Zellerbach told reporters Monday.

The murder charge is accompanied by two “special circumstances,” including killing a police officer on duty and firing a weapon from a vehicle.

Dorner was also charged with the attempted murder of three other police officers, including another Riverside officer who was wounded when Crain was killed. That officer, whose name has not been released, is in a lot of pain and faces “many surgeries,” Riverside Police Chief Sergio Diaz said.

Dorner is also accused of opening fire on two LAPD police officers, wounding one, in the suburb of Corona.

There has been speculation, based in part on an arrest warrant affidavit filed last week, that Dorner could have crossed state lines into Nevada or made his way to Mexico.

Federal authorities, meanwhile, were asking anyone across the country with information about Dorner or his whereabouts to contact their local FBI or U.S. Marshals Service.

LAPD reopens case that led to Dorner’s dismissal

Over the weekend, LAPD said it was reopening the case that resulted in his termination.

Dorner accused his training officer of kicking a mentally ill man during an arrest in 2007. The LAPD ruled the complaint unfounded and kicked Dorner off the force for filing a false complaint.

Dorner challenged his firing in court and lost.

In a manifesto released last week, Dorner blamed racism and corruption in the LAPD for his termination and vowed to wage “unconventional and asymmetrical warfare” against LAPD officers and their families. He called it a “last resort” to clear his name and strike back at a department he says mistreated him.

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck had a different term for it Sunday.

“This is an act — and make no mistake about it — of domestic terrorism,” he told reporters Sunday. “This is a man who has targeted those that we entrust to protect the public. His actions cannot go unanswered.”

Targeting police

Authorities say Dorner began making good on his threats on February 3 when he allegedly killed Quan, 27, and Lawrence in an Irvine parking lot, south of Los Angeles.

According to the manifesto, Randal Quan, Monica Quan’s father, bungled Dorner’s LAPD termination appeal.

Randal Quan represented Dorner during the disciplinary hearing that resulted in his firing. The officer was among dozens named in the manifesto.

The retired officer told investigators he received a call from someone identifying himself as Dorner who told him he “should have done a better job of protecting his daughter,” according to a federal arrest warrant affidavit.

Investigators traced the call to Vancouver, Washington, but based on the timing of other sightings, they don’t believe Dorner was in Vancouver at the time, the affidavit states.

Days later, early Thursday morning, Dorner allegedly opened fire on two LAPD police officers, wounding one, in the suburban city of Corona.

Roughly 20 minutes later, Dorner allegedly fired on two officers in the nearby city of Riverside, killing Crain and wounding another.

Since then, the LAPD has provided security and surveillance details for more than 50 police officers and their families — many of whom were named in the manifesto.

Additionally, the LAPD is no longer releasing the police chief’s schedule to the public or the media.

‘Ghosts’ of the LAPD’s past

It was Dorner’s allegations of racism at the LAPD that led Beck over the weekend to reopen the investigation into his claims.

Beck said he was not doing it to “appease a murderer” but out of concern that Dorner’s allegations will resurrect a painful part of the department’s history.

For years, the LAPD was dogged by complaints of racism and corruption. In 1965 and 1992, the city was rocked by racial riots that were sparked, in part, by claims of police racism and brutality.

“I hear the same things you hear: The ghosts of the past of the Los Angeles Police Department,” Beck said Sunday. “I hear that people think maybe there is something to what he says, and I want to put that to rest.”

Despite numerous reviews of Dorner’s case, he said it has “never been reviewed by me.”

“If there is anything new, we will deal with it, and we will deal with it in a public way,” Beck said.
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As the manhunt for the renegade ex-cop accused of killing three people in a revenge plot targeting the Los Angeles Police Department enters its second week, the big question facing authorities is: Where is Christopher Jordan Dorner?

The search, considered one of the largest in the history of Southern California, has taken authorities from Orange County to the border of Mexico, from Los Angeles to the Big Bear Lake resort area of the San Bernardino Mountains.

Even so, a week after Dorner allegedly began targeting police officers and their families, putting the region on edge, there was no sign of the man on Monday.

A “no bail” arrest warrant was issued for Dorner after the Riverside County district attorney filed a murder charge Monday against him in the killing of Riverside Police Officer Michael Crain.

“That allows him to be apprehended anywhere within California, out of state or out of the country,” District Attorney Paul Zellerbach told reporters at a news conference Monday.

The murder charge is accompanied by two “special circumstances,” including killing a police officer on duty and firing a weapon from a vehicle, Zellerbach said.

Dorner was also charged with the attempted murder of three other police officers, including a Riverside officer who was wounded when Crain was killed. That officer, whose name has not been made public, is in a lot of pain and faces “many surgeries,” Riverside Police Chief Sergio Diaz said.

The other two charges accuse Dorner of opening fire on two LAPD police officers, wounding one, in the suburb of Corona.

Los Angeles police spokesman Lt. Andy Neiman said the department had received more than 700 tips on Dorner’s whereabouts. Some of the calls have come from Dorner’s past acquaintances or people who think they have spotted the fugitive.

The city of Los Angeles put up $1 million in reward money Sunday for help catching Dorner, an announcement that followed news that the LAPD was reopening the case that resulted in his termination.

Dorner accused his training officer of kicking a mentally ill man during an arrest in 2007. The LAPD ruled the complaint unfounded and booted Dorner off the force for filing a false complaint. He challenged his firing in court and lost.

In a manifesto released last week, Dorner blamed racism and corruption in the LAPD for his termination and vowed to wage “unconventional and asymmetrical warfare” against LAPD officers and their families. He called it a “last resort” to clear his name and strike back at a department he says mistreated him.

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck had a different term for it Sunday.

“This is an act — and make no mistake about it — of domestic terrorism,” he told reporters Sunday during a televised news conference. “This is a man who has targeted those that we entrust to protect the public. His actions cannot go unanswered.”

Targeting police

Authorities say Dorner began making good on his threats on February 4 when he allegedly killed Monica Quan and her fiance, Keith Lawrence, in an Irvine parking lot, south of Los Angeles.

Quan was the daughter of a now-retired Los Angeles police officer, who represented Dorner during the disciplinary hearing that resulted in his firing. The officer was among dozens named in the manifesto.

The retired officer told investigators that he received a call from someone identifying himself as Dorner who told him he “should have done a better job of protecting his daughter,” according to a federal arrest warrant affidavit. Investigators traced the call to Vancouver, Washington, but based on the timing of other sightings, they don’t believe Dorner was in Vancouver at the time, the affidavit states.

Days later, early Thursday morning, Dorner allegedly opened fire on two LAPD police officers, wounding one, in the suburban city of Corona.

Roughly 20 minutes later, Dorner allegedly fired on two officers in the nearby city of Riverside, killing one and wounding another. On Sunday, authorities identified the slain officer as Michael Crain, an 11-year veteran of the Riverside Police Department.

Since then, the LAPD has provided more than 50 police officers and their families — many of whom were named in the manifesto — with security and surveillance details.

Additionally, the LAPD is no longer releasing the police chief’s schedule to the public or the media.

Beck refused to discuss whether Dorner had been observed in the neighborhoods of any of those named in the manifesto, but added: “You fish where the fish are, and Mr. Dorner has made his intentions very clear.”

In recent days, the search for the 270-pound, 6-foot Dorner has been focused on the Big Bear Lake area, where authorities say his burning truck was discovered last week after he allegedly began carrying out his threats to kill police and their family members.

Search continues

The search was scaled back in the mountain resort community on Sunday. None of the tips the department has received so far has panned out, San Bernardino County sheriff’s spokeswoman Lehua Pahia said.

Beck said the search would continue to focus on Dorner’s last known locations in the Big Bear area.

“But our search continues in and around the area where we have known targets,” Beck said.

But there has been speculation, based in part on an arrest warrant affidavit filed last week, that Dorner could have crossed state lines into Nevada or made his way to Mexico.

Federal authorities, meanwhile, were asking anyone across the country with information about Dorner or his whereabouts to contact their local FBI or U.S. Marshals Service.

“Should any citizen have information, I encourage you to make that phone call,” said Bill L. Lewis, the assistant director of the FBI’s Los Angeles division.

Police were also chasing down unconfirmed sightings of Dorner, including one Sunday in the San Fernando Valley after two people reported seeing someone who resembled the former police officer inside a Lowes home improvement store.

The store in Northridge was evacuated, but there was no sign of Dorner.

The LAPD, meanwhile, also beefed up security at the Grammy Awards on Sunday “out of an abundance of caution,” police Cmdr. Andy Smith said.

‘Ghosts’ of the LAPD’s past

It’s Dorner’s allegations of racism at the LAPD that led Beck over the weekend to reopen the investigation into his claims.

Beck said he was not doing it to “appease a murderer” but out of concern that Dorner’s allegations will resurrect a painful part of the department’s history.

For years, the LAPD was dogged by complaints of racism and corruption. In 1965 and 1992, the city was rocked by racial riots that were sparked, in part, by claims of police racism and brutality.

“I hear the same things you hear: The ghosts of the past of the Los Angeles Police Department,” Beck said Sunday. “I hear that people think maybe there is something to what he says, and I want to put that to rest.”

Despite numerous reviews of Dorner’s case, he said it has “never been reviewed by me.”

“If there is anything new, we will deal with it, and we will deal with it in a public way,” Beck said.
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Los Angeles — The city of Los Angeles put up $1 million in reward money Sunday for help catching Christopher Dorner, the renegade ex-cop accused of killing three people in a vendetta against his old department.

“We will not tolerate anyone undermining the security, the tranquility of our neighborhoods and our communities,” Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa told reporters. “We will not tolerate this reign of terror that has robbed us of the peace of mind that residents of Southern California deserve. We will not tolerate this murderer remaining at large.”

The offer — raised in conjunction with businesses, private donors and community groups — is “the largest ever offered to our knowledge,” Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck said. The hope is it will shake loose a tip that leads to Dorner’s eventual conviction.

The Los Angeles Police Department says Dorner, a 270-pound, 6-foot former Navy officer, was fired in 2009 for filing a false complaint of excessive force against his training officer. In an interview aired Sunday on CNN affiliate KCBS, Beck called Dorner a “trained assassin” but said he wouldn’t be harmed if he gave himself up.

“If you turn yourself in, then you will be safe and nobody else has to die,” he said. “If you don’t, if you decide to try to take the life of another Los Angeles police officer or their family member, then you’ll have to suffer the consequences.”

Amid the manhunt, the LAPD beefed up security at Sunday night’s Grammy Awards show “out of an abundance of caution,” police Cmdr. Andy Smith said. And Villaraigosa said authorities are confident they’ll catch Dorner.

“This search is not a matter of if. It’s a matter of when,” Villaraigosa said. “And I want Christopher Dorner to know that.”

Chief calls it ‘domestic terrorism’

Dorner accused his training officer of kicking a mentally ill man during an arrest in 2007. The LAPD ruled the complaint unfounded and kicked Dorner off the force for filing a false complaint. He challenged his firing in court and lost.

In a manifesto released last week, he blamed racism and corruption in the department for his removal and vowed to wage “unconventional and asymmetrical warfare” against LAPD officers and their families. He called it a “last resort” to clear his name and strike back at a department he says mistreated him.

Beck had a different term for it Sunday.

“This is an act — and make no mistake about it — of domestic terrorism,” he said. “This is a man who has targeted those that we entrust to protect the public. His actions cannot go unanswered.”

But the chief announced Saturday that the LAPD would re-examine its proceedings against Dorner. The review is “not to appease a murderer,” but “to reassure the public that their police department is transparent and fair in all things we do,” he said.

“I am aware of the ghosts of the LAPD’s past, and one of my biggest concerns is that they will be resurrected by Dorner’s allegations of racism within the department,” Beck said.

Mountain dragnet scaled back

Meanwhile, about 90 miles east of the city, the dragnet was back in action around the Big Bear Lake resort in the San Bernardino Mountains. After working through a weekend of heavy snow and overnight temperatures in the single digits, investigators were trying to pick up Dorner’s trail anew after his burned-out truck was found there Thursday afternoon near the property of someone a federal arrest affidavit described as a known associate.

But there has been speculation, based in part on the affidavit, that the suspect could have crossed sate lines into Nevada or made his way into Mexico.

The day’s effort began with about 60 officers, San Bernardino County sheriff’s spokeswoman Lehua Pahia said. But by early afternoon, it had been scaled back to about 25 investigators, aided by a helicopter equipped with body-heat sensors and other specialized equipment, Pahia said. None of the tips the department had received so far has panned out, she said.

According to authorities, Dorner began making good on his threats a week ago when he killed Monica Quan and her fiance, Keith Lawrence, in a parking lot in Irvine, south of Los Angeles. Quan was the daughter of a now-retired Los Angeles police officer who represented Dorner in a disciplinary hearing that led to his termination.

Days later, early Thursday morning, Dorner allegedly opened fire on two LAPD police officers, wounding one, in the suburban city of Corona.

Roughly 20 minutes later, Dorner allegedly fired on two police officers in the nearby city of Riverside, killing one and wounding another. On Sunday, authorities identified the slain officer as Michael Crain, an 11-year veteran officer.

LAPD guarding 50 police families

Authorities say Dorner spent at least two days in the San Diego area after the shooting of Quan and her fiance. Dorner’s ID and some of his personal belongings were found Thursday at the San Ysidro Point of Entry at the U.S.-Mexico border, according to the affidavit.

Border patrol agents have been searching cars crossing into Mexico for signs of Dorner, while authorities have searched a home Dorner owned in Las Vegas and one owned by his mother in La Palma, California.

Two sailors reported that Dorner, a former Navy lieutenant, approached them at the San Diego-area Point Loma Naval Base, and local police allege he attempted to steal a boat.

And Monica Quan’s father told investigators that someone identifying himself as Dorner called him Thursday and told him he “should have done a better job of protecting his daughter,” the federal affidavit states. Investigators traced the call to Vancouver, Washington, but based on the timing of other sightings, they don’t believe Dorner was in Vancouver at the time, the affidavit states.

Beck said the LAPD is now guarding the families of more than 50 police officers. Officers guarding one house early Thursday shot and wounded two women who were driving a pickup similar to Dorner’s, something Beck called a “tragic, horrific incident.”

Beck said that the shootings of Margie Carranza, 47, and her mother, Emma Hernandez, 71, occurred a day after the manhunt for Dorner began and that the officers were under enormous pressure.

CNN’s AnneClaire Stapleton and Irving Last contributed to this report. Paul Vercammen and Stan Wilson reported from Big Bear Lake. Matt Smith wrote from Atlanta.

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The city of Los Angeles put up $1 million in reward money Sunday for help catching Christopher Dorner, the renegade ex-cop accused of killing three people in a vendetta against his old department.

“We will not tolerate anyone undermining the security, the tranquility of our neighborhoods and our communities,” Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa told reporters. “We will not tolerate this reign of terror that has robbed us of the peace of mind that residents of Southern California deserve. We will not tolerate this murderer remaining at large.”

The offer — raised in conjunction with businesses, private donors and community groups — is “the largest ever offered to our knowledge,” Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck said. The hope is it will shake loose a tip that leads to Dorner’s eventual conviction.

The Los Angeles Police Department says Dorner, a 270-pound, 6-foot former Navy officer, was fired in 2009 for filing a false complaint of excessive force against his training officer. In an interview aired Sunday on CNN affiliate KCBS, Beck called Dorner a “trained assassin” but said he wouldn’t be harmed if he gave himself up.

“If you turn yourself in, then you will be safe and nobody else has to die,” he said. “If you don’t, if you decide to try to take the life of another Los Angeles police officer or their family member, then you’ll have to suffer the consequences.”

Amid the manhunt, the LAPD beefed up security at Sunday night’s Grammy Awards show “out of an abundance of caution,” police Cmdr. Andy Smith said. And Villaraigosa said authorities are confident they’ll catch Dorner.

“This search is not a matter of if. It’s a matter of when,” Villaraigosa said. “And I want Christopher Dorner to know that.”

Chief calls it ‘domestic terrorism’

Dorner accused his training officer of kicking a mentally ill man during an arrest in 2007. The LAPD ruled the complaint unfounded and kicked Dorner off the force for filing a false complaint. He challenged his firing in court and lost.

In a manifesto released last week, he blamed racism and corruption in the department for his removal and vowed to wage “unconventional and asymmetrical warfare” against LAPD officers and their families. He called it a “last resort” to clear his name and strike back at a department he says mistreated him.

Beck had a different term for it Sunday.

“This is an act — and make no mistake about it — of domestic terrorism,” he said. “This is a man who has targeted those that we entrust to protect the public. His actions cannot go unanswered.”

But the chief announced Saturday that the LAPD would re-examine its proceedings against Dorner. The review is “not to appease a murderer,” but “to reassure the public that their police department is transparent and fair in all things we do,” he said.

“I am aware of the ghosts of the LAPD’s past, and one of my biggest concerns is that they will be resurrected by Dorner’s allegations of racism within the department,” Beck said.

Mountain dragnet scaled back

Meanwhile, about 90 miles east of the city, the dragnet was back in action around the Big Bear Lake resort in the San Bernardino Mountains. After working through a weekend of heavy snow and overnight temperatures in the single digits, investigators were trying to pick up Dorner’s trail anew after his burned-out truck was found there Thursday afternoon near the property of someone a federal arrest affidavit described as a known associate.

But there has been speculation, based in part on the affidavit, that the suspect could have crossed sate lines into Nevada or made his way into Mexico.

The day’s effort began with about 60 officers, San Bernardino County sheriff’s spokeswoman Lehua Pahia said. But by early afternoon, it had been scaled back to about 25 investigators, aided by a helicopter equipped with body-heat sensors and other specialized equipment, Pahia said. None of the tips the department had received so far has panned out, she said.

According to authorities, Dorner began making good on his threats a week ago when he killed Monica Quan and her fiance, Keith Lawrence, in a parking lot in Irvine, south of Los Angeles. Quan was the daughter of a now-retired Los Angeles police officer who represented Dorner in a disciplinary hearing that led to his termination.

Days later, early Thursday morning, Dorner allegedly opened fire on two LAPD police officers, wounding one, in the suburban city of Corona.

Roughly 20 minutes later, Dorner allegedly fired on two police officers in the nearby city of Riverside, killing one and wounding another. On Sunday, authorities identified the slain officer as Michael Crain, an 11-year veteran officer.

LAPD guarding 50 police families

Authorities say Dorner spent at least two days in the San Diego area after the shooting of Quan and her fiance. Dorner’s ID and some of his personal belongings were found Thursday at the San Ysidro Point of Entry at the U.S.-Mexico border, according to the affidavit.

Border patrol agents have been searching cars crossing into Mexico for signs of Dorner, while authorities have searched a home Dorner owned in Las Vegas and one owned by his mother in La Palma, California.

Two sailors reported that Dorner, a former Navy lieutenant, approached them at the San Diego-area Point Loma Naval Base, and local police allege he attempted to steal a boat.

And Monica Quan’s father told investigators that someone identifying himself as Dorner called him Thursday and told him he “should have done a better job of protecting his daughter,” the federal affidavit states. Investigators traced the call to Vancouver, Washington, but based on the timing of other sightings, they don’t believe Dorner was in Vancouver at the time, the affidavit states.

Beck said the LAPD is now guarding the families of more than 50 police officers. Officers guarding one house early Thursday shot and wounded two women who were driving a pickup similar to Dorner’s, something Beck called a “tragic, horrific incident.”

Beck said that the shootings of Margie Carranza, 47, and her mother, Emma Hernandez, 71, occurred a day after the manhunt for Dorner began and that the officers were under enormous pressure.
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Big Bear Lake, California (CNN) — The Los Angeles Police Department will reopen its investigation into the firing of an officer that prompted alleged revenge attacks as the hunt for the man accused of killing three people widened in Southern California’s San Bernardino Mountains.

Christopher Jordan Dorner declared war on police in a manifesto after being fired by the LAPD and losing appeals to be reinstated, claiming that racism in the police department was behind him losing his job.

“I feel we need to publicly address Dorner’s allegations regarding his termination,” LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said in a statement released Saturday.

“…I do this not to appease a murderer. I do it to reassure the public that their police department is transparent and fair in all things we do.”

Beck ordered a re-examination of all evidence and new interviews with all witnesses connected to Dorner’s 2009 firing after the LAPD ruled that he lied two years earlier in a complaint he filed against his training officer.

“I am aware of the ghosts of the LAPD’s past, and one of my biggest concerns is that they will be resurrected by Dorner’s allegations of racism within the department,” Beck said.

‘Last resort’

In the manifesto posted online, 33-year-old Dorner promised to bring “unconventional and asymmetrical warfare” to officers and their families, calling it the “last resort” to clear his name and strike back at a department he says mistreated him.

According to authorities, Dorner began making good on his threats a week ago when he allegedly killed Monica Quan and her fiance, Keith Lawrence, in a parking lot in Irvine, south of Los Angeles.

Quan was the daughter of a now-retired Los Angeles police officer who represented Dorner in a disciplinary hearing that led resulted in his termination.

Timeline in hunt for Dorner

Days later, early Thursday morning, Dorner allegedly opened fire on two LAPD police officers, wounding one, in the suburban city of Corona.

Roughly 20 minutes later, Dorner allegedly fired on two police officers, killing one and wounding another, in the nearby city of Riverside.

Widening manhunt

Since then, much of the manhunt for Dorner has focused in and around the San Bernardino County mountaintop resort of Big Bear Lake after Dorner’s pickup was found burning in the area.

As the dragnet entered its fourth day Sunday, the manhunt widened with the creation of a joint task force that brought together state and local law enforcement officials along with the FBI and the U.S. Marshals Service.

“We will look under every rock. We will look around every corner. We will search every mountaintop,” Riverside Asst. Police Chief Chris Vicino told reporters Saturday.

In the snow-packed San Bernardino Mountains, officers trudged through fresh snow as they searched homes, knocking on doors and peeking in windows, for Dorner.

But as the search continued with no sign of Dorner, questions were raised about whether he escaped the dragnet — possibly days earlier.

Arrest warrant

A federal arrest warrant affidavit said Dorner’s burned-out truck was found on the property of a known associate in the Big Bear Lake area Thursday afternoon.

There has been no sign of Dorner since Thursday, and there has been speculation, based in part on the affidavit, that he has possibly crossed state lines into Nevada or made his way into Mexico.

Authorities say Dorner spent at least two days in the San Diego area following the shooting of Quan and her fiance.

Dorner’s ID and some of his personal belongings were found Thursday at the San Ysidro Point of Entry at the U.S.-Mexico border, according to the affidavit.

Border patrol agents have been searching cars crossing into Mexico for signs of Dorner, while authorities have searched a home Dorner owned in Las Vegas and one owned by his mother in La Palma, California.

Two sailors also reported Dorner, a former Navy lieutenant, approached them at the San Diego-area Point Loma Naval Base, and local police allege he attempted to steal a boat.

Even so, the focus of the manhunt remains on the San Bernardino Mountains where the search has been slowed by heavy snowfall.

Search teams were aided by helicopters, snowcats and armored personnel carriers with snow chains.

On alert

Los Angeles-area police and a number of military installations have been on alert since the shootings, while authorities chase down a number of unconfirmed sightings of the 270-pound, 6-foot Dorner.

In the manifesto and on a Facebook page, Dorner allegedly singled out as targets a number of officers and their families, who have been under guard since the shootings.

The LAPD chief on Saturday described the police shooting of two women who were driving a pickup similar to the one Dorner owned as a “tragic, horrific incident.”

In an interview with CNN affiliate KCBS, Beck said the shootings of Margie Carranza, 47, and her mother, 71-year-old Emma Hernandez, occurred a day after the manhunt for Dorner began.

He said the officers were under enormous pressure.

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