The Chicago area’s lake effect snowfall

Dear Tom,
I have a bet with a friend who says that the Chicago area does not get lake-effect snow and that it only occurs on the east and south side of the lake. Who is right?
— Ken Sacks, Chicago
Dear Ken,
Tell your friend to pay up. While lake-effect snow is much more frequent and heavier on the Indiana and Michigan sides of Lake Michigan, a result of the northwest winds accompanying arctic outbreaks, Chicago still gets its fair share when winds turn northeast. Chicago also receives lake-enhanced snow, often posting larger storm totals than inland areas, due to the prevailing northeast flow as low pressure passes south of the city. Chicago climatologist Frank Wachowski reports that one of the city’s biggest lake-effect snow events occurred Dec. 19, 1973, when 5 to 12 inches fell in the city with up to 2 feet along the west shore of the lake as far north as Green Bay, Wis.
While lake-effect snow is much more frequent and heavier on the Indiana and Michigan sides of Lake Michigan, Chicago still gets its fair share when winds turn northeast.