Bears take time out to cheer on and cheer up patients at children’s hospital

CHICAGO -- Chicago Bears players may have been disappointing fans on the field lately, but in the hospital halls and by the bedside, they are scoring big.

Lurie Childrens patients got up close and personal with teammates who say, in the game of life – you have to support those who mean the most. And that’s what they did today.

Members of the team came to cheer on young patients, who come for chemotherapy, infusions and other regular treatments.

They've faced more than a few challenges this season, but here they were super heroes for the day. No score, no stats, just a collective show of support for the young patients -- all facing their own set of challenges that far outweigh any struggles on the football field.

“It was funny, the elevator opened up and you see like, 12 Bears there, and they’re all a lot bigger than they seem on tv,” said patient Mohammed Kadiri. “It was definitely cool to see and you really do appreciate it when people do things like that.”

“I love kids and they are just natural born happy people,” said linebacker Danny Trevathan.  “And they are going thru so much and they don’t know how strong they are and just to be here and pat them on the shoulder and just smile at them is enough for me.”

But there's an even deeper meaning behind today's visit. The 20 plus bears who made the trip to Lurie did so to show their support for a colleague on the sidelines. Asst Athletic trainer Will Rogers' daughter Charlotte is a patient at Lurie. Lurie children’s hospital is a familiar place – which brings both tears and hope.

“It hits home for us for our trainer Will,” says punter Pat O’Donnell.  “His daughter is going through leukemia so this is a big thing for us to help him out today. He’s there for us every single day.  He’s gone through it since training camp so he was able to take some days off and do some things for his daughter Charlotte.  So we’re here today to help him out because we’re a family and that’s what it’s about.”

“Anything we can do to bring light to his situation and help our brother our family out it’s done,” says Trevathan.

And the support goes beyond these walls. At Soldier Field on Sunday, every point scored for San Francisco came from the foot of Robbie Gould, playing against the Bears but in honor of his former trainer.  He was wearing a shoe specially designed in honor of Lurie Children’s and Charlotte.

Today’s visit was to the 18th floor which caters to kids with cancer and those with blood disorders. In many cases, the sickest of the sick who for today felt the strength of a professional football player.