Chicago increases security efforts, police presence after NYC terror attack

CHICAGO -- In New York, law enforcement is dissecting every aspect of Sayfullo Saipov’s life leading up to the attack and in Chicago, authorities are asking what can be done, if anything, to stop such a thing from happening in the city.

Investigators said it appeared the attack had been planned for weeks by a man who only became radicalized ironically after entering the United States in 2010. Authorities said he was inspired by ISIS as indicated by a note left behind.

Former Secret Service Agent Arnette Heintze now runs a security and risk management company in Chicago.

“He does seem to be a lone wolf and this individual had personality disorders or mental health challenges,” he said.

But what was the tipping point? And other questions rise such as, how active was he on social media? ISIS actively recruits online and aims to inspire through YouTube, Facebook and other sites where anti-American rantings and ravings are not uncommon.

But what constitutes a real and present danger?

“We want to protect individual rights in this country and freedom of speech but there is a line you cross when you threaten when you show behavior that is so concerning,” Heintze said.

Americans are at risk and that's what has to be looked at—whether or not he crossed a line.

The city's top cop said Chicagoans can expect to see a more visible presence of officers in light of Tuesday's terrorist attack in New York City.

Police squad cars equipped with heavy artillery parked in the middle of State Street yesterday. Officers also were very visible along Michigan Avenue Tuesday evening.

"Rest assured we’re taking additional actions and placing additional resources in high traffic areas just out of an abundance of caution," Superintendent Eddie Johnson said,

Johnson said the focus will be on high-traffic areas and landmarks like Navy Pier, Millennium Park and the Lakefront bike path.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel said the city tries to learn from every act of terrorism, to adapt police and emergency response strategies.

“It's a very fair question. That said I don't have the answer but will get you the answers in the sense of what we do with truck rentals,” he said.

Even if security screening would one day apply to truck rentals, it wouldn't have mattered in New York’s case because Saipov was not a terror watch list but authorities say some of his associates were.