The Cubs ‘Nacho Man’ parody you knew was coming is here

CHICAGO — Just as the force of gravity inevitably pulls a tray of nachos down to earth, the ubiquity of the Internet inspires artists to turn a moment into a work of art, and in this case, a parody of a disco classic called “Nacho Man.”

During a game against the St. Louis Cardinals on their home turf Monday night, the Cubs’ Addison Russell made a dramatic dive for a fly ball as it headed into the stands in left field. While he missed the ball, he did knock a tray of nachos out of a Cardinals fan’s hands. What came next made the moment go viral.

The lyrics from Danny Rockett’s “Nacho Man,” which was later posted online, sums it up:

A collision in between Addy and Nacho Man,
Tried to catch a foul ball, diving in the stands.
Ended up covered in his nachos,
Chips and sticky cheese sauce in his clothes.
But that good old Addy went back to Nacho Man,
brought him some new nachos and selfie’d with a fan.

As the moment went viral, the Cardinals fan became known on the Internet and sports broadcasts as “Nacho Man.” The fan, Andrew Gudermuth, even joined the WGN Morning News to share his story.

Mere days later, Rockett made the connection between the name and the song that may have influenced it in the first place, the 1978 hit “Macho Man” by the Village People. Rockett has done other Cubs-themed songs before, including a holiday song for Jon Lester and a Beatles parody for Jason Heyward.

But this isn’t the first time artists noticed that “macho” and “nacho” do in fact rhyme and would make a fun, delicious twist on the classic anthem. Among them was nacho fan and noted cartoon poet Homer Simpson, who sang his revised version of the chorus while chomping on a tortilla sombrero topped with cheese in an episode of The Simpsons that aired in 1994.

And then there was the Old El Paso commercial from the 90’s that made the connection to show how fun and easy it can be to crack open a few cans and make nachos in a microwave all by yourself.

The ad created by Chicago-based agency Leo Burnett was called a called a “disco nightmare” by Dave Vadehra in AdAge after it debuted on July 4, 1996, but Vadehra also conceded that sales of the products seemed to increase after it was released.

Maybe we all do want to be a “Nacho Man.”