When is the next lunar eclipse, and how is it different from solar eclipse?

Dear Tom,
After the solar eclipse, I became curious about lunar eclipses. I was wondering when the next one is and how does it differ from a solar eclipse?
— Colleen Siemann, North Aurora

Dear Colleen,
A lunar eclipse always occurs on the full moon when the Earth passes between the moon and the sun and the Earth’s shadow covers the moon. A solar eclipse occurs on the new moon when the moon passes between the Earth and the sun, blocking it from view as the moon’s shadow falls upon the Earth. Chicago’s next total lunar eclipse will occur early next year on Jan. 31, the month’s second full moon. It will begin at 4:50 a.m. and reach totality just before it sets on the western horizon at 6:51 a.m. The end of the eclipse will not be visible here after 7:06 a.m., when the disappears below the horizon.
A lunar eclipse always occurs on the full moon when the Earth passes between the moon and the sun and the Earth’s shadow covers the moon.