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Illinois Rep. Quigley’s ‘COVFEFE Act’ would make social media a presidential record

WASHINGTON D.C. — Illinois Congressman Mike Quigley introduced a tongue-in-cheek legislation today called the Covfefe Act.

“Covfefe” is an enigma that captured national attention when President Trump used the word in a puzzling tweet. It became the butt of many jokes on social media, with people attempting to figure out the meaning of the word, that most evidently was just a typo.

Quigley’s use of Covfefe however, is an acronym for his “Communications Over Various Feeds Electronically for Engagement” Act.

The bill structures a guidance set in place by the National Archives that moves to amend the Presidential Records Act to include the term “social media” as material that should be documented. The hope is that this ensures the preservation of presidential communication and statements while also attempting to promote accountability.

“In order to maintain public trust in government, elected officials must answer for what they do and say; this includes 140-character tweets,” said Rep. Quigley. “President Trump’s frequent, unfiltered use of his personal Twitter account as a means of official communication is unprecedented. If the President is going to take to social media to make sudden public policy proclamations, we must ensure that these statements are documented and preserved for future reference. Tweets are powerful, and the President must be held accountable for every post.”

The National Archives released this guidance stating its belief that social media merits historical recording, in 2014.

Quigley is the co-founder and co-chair of the Congressional Transparency Caucus.