Where is the level of Lake Michigan today compared with its historical high and low points?

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Dear Tom,
Where is the level of Lake Michigan today compared with its historical high and low points?
— David Schaffer
Dear David,
Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, connected at their north ends by the 5-mile-wide Strait of Mackinac, are actually one lake in a hydrologic sense. Their levels fluctuate together and are identical. Accurate records of lake levels began in 1918, but earlier records do exist. In data beginning in 1864, the highest level was 582.6 feet above sea level in June 1886, but since 1918 (which is considered to be the beginning of accurate measurements), the highest level is 582.35 feet in October 1986. The lowest level of the Michigan-Huron system is 576.02 feet, recorded in January 2013. The difference between those extreme values is a very considerable 6.33 feet. The level of the lakes as of Thursday was 579.04 feet.