Is a hypnosis app for you?

So what can't your smartphone do these days?

Here's something you may or may not have thought of: Your phone can even be used to hypnotize you.

Traditionally hypnosis is done under the direction of a professional in an office, with an appointment and a fee.

Now that experience can be replicated with an app.

Or can it?

Bella Lledos has been a hypnosis client for the past five months. She drifts away from the real world and calms herself under the voice of certified hypnotist Toni Macri-Reine at No Stage Show where an audience watches a person get hypnotized before their very eyes. This is the one thing that's helped Lledos cope with life's challenges.

But not the only thing.

When Lledos leaves her certified hypnotist, she continues her treatment in the palm of her hand, through a hypnosis app.

Apps like the one she uses are growing in popularity. There are thousands of them in the app store, from smoking to weight loss and sleep assistance, all at your fingertips.

Is it a cheaper and easier alternative than a doctor's appointment? Maybe. But critics say cutting out the professional and opening a world of unregulated technology often created by people with no medical experience at all.

Hypnosis can be dangerous, even deadly. In Florida, three teens died after being hypnotized by their high school principal.

The National Institutes of Health took a deep dive into the world of hypnosis apps. They looked at 407 iTunes apps and found only 7% of the apps mentioned the hypnotist being a doctor. 34% said the hypnotist was trained or certified. None of them reported being tested for efficacy or being evidenced based.

If you decide to use a hypnosis app make sure you are in a safe environment like your house when you do it.

If you end up going a different route, with a certified hypnotist, do your research. Check online reviews.