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What does the future hold for shared mobility?

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CHICAGO -- Transportation leaders from across the world are in Chicago this week to talk about the ways new “shared” technology can help get cars off the road.

They’re here for the National Shared Use Mobility Summit.

Every idea at the conference is aimed at helping people transition from owning a vehicle to shared use transportation.

Divvy bikes, E-Bikes and car sharing are all on display as well as other technology that hasn’t yet made its way to Chicago.

Like Car-2-Go. They’re in 14 cities throughout North America and it’s like ZipCar, a shared-use vehicle, only you don’t have to return it to a specific location when you’re done.

And what about Divvy riders who want to ride safe, but don’t have a helmet?  The answer may be a bike helmet vending machine.  And a company called Kranium plans to fill them with recyclable, sustainable helmets made of cardboard.

And if you want use a bike to get to work, but don’t want to get all hot and sweaty, Velobility may be for you.  In Switzerland, you can use your smartphone to unlock the bike and then the pedal assist helps you go faster, using less effort.

They set a goal at the conference that they want to push to get one million cars off the road in the next five years by making car sharing, bike sharing and public transportation more convenient and user friendly.