Hillary Clinton gets impatient with reporters, defends use of private email server

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LAS VEGAS -- Hillary Clinton got impatient with reporters during  a campaign stop in Las Vegas, over her use of a private email server while she was Secretary of State.
The following is her exchange with the media on Tuesday:
Clinton: "In retrospect what was supposed to be convenient has turned out to be anything but convenient. I have to say Jeff that the position that I have taken from the very beginning is the same today that it was months ago. And I've been thinking about the fact that, I get a lot of attention because I had a personal email account, as did other high-ranking officials in the State Department and elsewhere in the government and I had not sent classified material nor received anything marked classified.

If I had had a separate government account, so that I had and a totally designated government account and a totally designated personal account and I started running for president and I said I want the American people to see everything that was part of my time in the State Department because I think it is educational and I want the State Department to release all of my emails, which they already had by the way in the government computer system. We would be going through the same process. That is what I want Americans to understand: When something is released, whether it is in response to a Freedom of Information Request or in my case, I said there are 55,000 page out there, please put them out. There is a process that has to be gone through, we want to make sure nobody's personal email is on there and other personnel issues that those things.

So, we would be going through the same because other agencies get to make the same claims, like, you know this may not have been an issue in 2009, but now it is. Or in 2011 this should have been handled differently than it was. That has nothing to do with me and it has nothing to do with the fact my account was personal. It is the process by which the government, and sometimes in disagreement among different agencies of the government… make decision about what can and cannot be disclosed.

So I am very comfortable that this will eventually get resolved. And, the American people will have plenty of time to figure it out."

(Reporter asks question off camera)

Clinton: "Look Ed, I take responsibly. I just told Jeff, in retrospect, this didn't turn out to be convenient at all. And I regret this has become such a cause celebre.
But that does not change the facts. And no matter what anybody tries to say, the facts are stubborn. What I did was legally permitted. Number one, first and foremost, ok? Number 2, I turned over out of an abundance of an attempt to be helpful, over anything that I thought was even vaguely related , in fact they have already concluded more than 1,200 of the emails I gave them have nothing to do with the work.

And I said make them public. And that's the process that one goes through to make them public.

I know there is a certain level of anxiety or interest in this. But the facts are the facts."

(Reporter asks question off camera)

Clinton: "But Ed, you are not listening to me. If it were a government account, they would be saying the same thing."

Reporter: "Classified information got out …"

Clinton: "First of all, that is not in any way agreed up. State Department disagreed. That happens all the time in these efforts to say what can go out and what can't go out. That is a part of the ordinary process. Everybody is acting like this first time this has ever happened, it happens all the time. And I can only tell you that the State Department has said over and over again, we disagree. So that is what they are sorting out and that is what happens a lot of the times. But whether it was a personal account or a government account, I did not send classified material and I did not receive any material that was marked or designated classified, which is the way you know whether something is. What you are seeing now is a disagreement between agencies saying, you know what, they should of and the other saying, no they shouldn't That has nothing to do with me. If it has been a government account and I said released it, we would be having the same arguments."

Reporter: "Did you try and wipe the entire server?"

Clinton: "Well, My personal emails are my personal business, right? So we went through a painstaking process and turned over 55,000 pages of anything we thought could be work related. Under the law, that decision is made by the official. I was the official. I made those decisions. And as I just said, over 1,200 of the emails have been deemed not work related.

Now, all I can tell you is in retrospect, if I had used a government account and I had said, lets released everything, lets let everyone in America see what I did for four years, we would have the same arguments."

Reporter: "Did you try to wipe the whole server?"

Clinton: "I have no idea, that is why we turned it over."

Reporter: "You said you were in charge of it. Did you wipe the server?"

Clinton: "What, like with a cloth or something?"

Reporter: "I don't know, you know how it works digitally."

Clinton: "I don't know how it works digitally at all.

Ed, I know you want to make a point, and I can just repeat what I have said, in order to be as cooperative as possible we have turned over the server. They can do whatever they want to with the server to figure out what is there and what is not there. That is for the people investigating it to try to figure out, but we turned over everything that was work related, every single thing, Personal stuff, we did not, I had no obligation to do so. And didn't.

Thank you all. Thank you all very much."