President Obama uses N-word during interview on racism in America

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U.S. President Barack Obama returns to the White House June 21 2015, in Washington, DC. Obama is returning from a trip to Los Angeles and San Francisco, attending DNC events and speaking at the annual U.S. Conference of Mayors in San Francisco. (Photo by Aude Guerrucci-Pool/Getty Images)

U.S. President Barack Obama returns to the White House June 21 2015, in Washington, DC. Obama is returning from a trip to Los Angeles and San Francisco, attending DNC events and speaking at the annual U.S. Conference of Mayors in San Francisco. (Photo by Aude Guerrucci-Pool/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama is using the N-word to make his case that America is not cured of racism.

In an interview for a podcast, Obama tells comedian host Marc Maron that the legacy of slavery “casts a long shadow” that is part of America’s DNA.

Said Obama, in an excerpt from the roughly 46-minute mark of the full interview:

“The legacy of slavery, Jim Crow, discrimination in almost every institution of our lives, you know, that casts a long shadow, and that’s still part of our DNA that’s passed on. We’re not cured of it. Racism, we’re not cured of it. And it’s not just a matter of it not being polite to say ‘n—–‘ in public. That’s not the measure of whether racism still exists or not. It’s not just a matter of overt discrimination. Societies don’t overnight completely erase everything that happened 2-300 years prior.”

Obama also decried America’s inability to stop a “deranged” 21-year-old from getting a gun and causing great harm — a reference to the white suspect in the racially motivated shooting deaths of nine black church members in South Carolina.

He says he was never more “disgusted” than when gun control legislation failed to pass two years ago.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.