Nationwide ad featuring ‘dead’ child causes social media uproar

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An explosion of hate erupted on social media after a Super Bowl ad from Nationwide insurance featured a dead child.

In the commercial, a child talks about how he’ll never learn to ride a bike, get cooties, travel the world or get married – because he died.

“I couldn’t grow up,” the boy says, “because I died from an accident.”

The Nationwide ad then states that “the number one cause of childhood deaths is preventable accidents. At Nationwide, we believe in protecting what matters most, your kids. Together we can make safe happen.”

After the commercial aired, the Twitterverse went wild:

Nationwide says the sole purpose of the ad “was to start a conversation, not sell insurance.”

Sunday night, Nationwide issued this statement:

“Preventable injuries around the home are the leading cause of childhood deaths in America. Most people don’t know that. Nationwide ran an ad during the Super Bowl that started a fierce conversation. The sole purpose of this message was to start a conversation, not sell insurance. We want to build awareness of an issue that is near and dear to all of us—the safety and well being of our children. We knew the ad would spur a variety of reactions. In fact, thousands of people visited MakeSafeHappen.com, a new website to help educate parents and caregivers with information and resources in an effort to make their homes safer and avoid a potential injury or death. Nationwide has been working with experts for more than 60 years to make homes safer. While some did not care for the ad, we hope it served to begin a dialogue to make safe happen for children everywhere.”

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