Hospital: 3rd San Francisco airport crash victim dies

A third person has died from injuries sustained in last week’s crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214, a hospital spokeswoman said Friday.

San Francisco General spokeswoman Rachael Kagan identified the victim as a “minor girl,” without identifying her name, age or background. The girl has been in critical condition at the Bay Area hospital since last Saturday’s crash.

Two other people — both 16-year-old girls from China — were reported dead soon after the Boeing 777 crash landed at San Francisco Airport.

Efforts are continuing to determine why the giant jet came in too low and too slow before its main landing gear, then tail slammed into a seawall on the airport’s edge, then spun and burned before screeching to a stop.

Of the passengers and crew on board, 304 people survived — a handful of whom remain hospitalized with injuries.

The runway where Flight 214 crashed should reopen Sunday, San Francisco’s airport director said late Thursday.

Repairs to the runway were set to begin Friday after the aircraft is removed, according to John Martin.

An in-depth review of the cockpit voice recorder shows two pilots called for the landing to be aborted before the plane hit a seawall and crashed onto the runway, the head of the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday.

The first internal call by one of the three pilots in the cockpit to abort the landing came three seconds before the crash and a second was made by another pilot 1.5 seconds before impact, NTSB chief Deborah Hersman said.

The agency has begun wrapping up its investigation at the airport and crews are cleaning up the debris left by the crash. Investigators turned the runway back over to the airport. The runway has been closed since Saturday’s crash.

The investigation is slowly shifting back to NTSB headquarters in Washington, where authorities will work to find a more definitive answer about what led to the crash.

The passenger jet’s main landing gear slammed into the seawall between the airport and San Francisco Bay, spinning the aircraft 360 degrees as it broke into pieces and eventually caught fire.
TM & © 2013 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

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